The All Exclusive Podcast

S1 - E14 - Henry Patterson - Part One - “Never Trust a Daily Mail Photographer”

July 09, 2023 Jack Jenkins and Henry Patterson Season 1 Episode 14
S1 - E14 - Henry Patterson - Part One - “Never Trust a Daily Mail Photographer”
The All Exclusive Podcast
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The All Exclusive Podcast
S1 - E14 - Henry Patterson - Part One - “Never Trust a Daily Mail Photographer”
Jul 09, 2023 Season 1 Episode 14
Jack Jenkins and Henry Patterson

Welcome to a unique episode of our podcast where the script is flipped! Today, it’s not about our remarkable guests, but about me, your host, Henry. I'm trading the interviewer's chair for the guest's hot seat in this special Sunday edition, and tagging along for the journey is Mark Brewer, adding his own unique insights. Buckle up as we wander through a symphony of my childhood tales, fashion adventures, and an unforgettable encounter with a horse.

From PJs-as-trousers to my love for musicals, prepare to learn more about me than you ever thought you wanted to. Stay tuned as we trace my path to success, from the influential role of my parents and teachers to my early performing exploits. Marvel at my journey from authoring The Adventures of Sherbin Pip to sharing a screen with Richard Branson on The One Show. It's a roller-coaster ride loaded with laughs, triumphs, and a fair share of hurdles. 

We'll also talk about my first foray into public speaking and my transition into musical theatre. Hear about my experience at college, the life-defining impact of uninspiring teachers, and my road to self-belief. I'll share stories from my packed public speaking schedule, including a presentation at the famous O2 Arena and a tour of Asia alongside the legendary Tony Robbins. So join us, and come get to know your host, Henry, a little better. It's sure to be an episode filled with laughs, insights, and a few surprises.

Support the Show.

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Welcome to a unique episode of our podcast where the script is flipped! Today, it’s not about our remarkable guests, but about me, your host, Henry. I'm trading the interviewer's chair for the guest's hot seat in this special Sunday edition, and tagging along for the journey is Mark Brewer, adding his own unique insights. Buckle up as we wander through a symphony of my childhood tales, fashion adventures, and an unforgettable encounter with a horse.

From PJs-as-trousers to my love for musicals, prepare to learn more about me than you ever thought you wanted to. Stay tuned as we trace my path to success, from the influential role of my parents and teachers to my early performing exploits. Marvel at my journey from authoring The Adventures of Sherbin Pip to sharing a screen with Richard Branson on The One Show. It's a roller-coaster ride loaded with laughs, triumphs, and a fair share of hurdles. 

We'll also talk about my first foray into public speaking and my transition into musical theatre. Hear about my experience at college, the life-defining impact of uninspiring teachers, and my road to self-belief. I'll share stories from my packed public speaking schedule, including a presentation at the famous O2 Arena and a tour of Asia alongside the legendary Tony Robbins. So join us, and come get to know your host, Henry, a little better. It's sure to be an episode filled with laughs, insights, and a few surprises.

Support the Show.

Jack:

Henry Jack, episode 14. I've said 14 now, before we do begin this episode, i want to just almost highlight how we've begun this episode, because I remember you talking to me earlier in the week. You went back and listen to all of our intros. Yes for the podcast we've released so far, and they all start with Henry.

Henry:

Well, they either start with you going Henry or me going Jack which is so I just keep that thing going. One of us going, so episode 14. So they all start with one of those things. But, jack, it's a Sunday.

Jack:

It yes this is a little Sunday, special for you a little sprinkling on your Sunday.

Henry:

So I was thinking, jack, maybe we should have a little sing-along from Sunday in the park with George one of the greatest son timeshays.

Jack:

I thought you were gonna give us some sort of like I don't know Sunday Carol service to sing.

Henry:

Sunday Oh, we could do that. I could go back to my choir boy days.

Jack:

Give me oil in my lamp, keep me putting give me oil in my lamp.

Henry:

I pray everyone.

Jack:

Yeah, give me oil in my lamp, keep me putting, keep me putting to the break of day. Hey.

Henry:

We'll leave it there. That isn't really what I used to sing doing choral music. No, it was more requiem.

Jack:

I was gonna go for.

Henry:

Sunday in the park. Yeah, you get it. There are worse things than staring at the water with your posing for a picture, after sleeping on the ferry, after waking up at Seven on an island in the river on a Sunday.

Jack:

There's what there are worse things than it's listening to you.

Henry:

Wait what?

Henry:

what a child lyrics hang on It's well, there are worse things than staring at the water, but no well, there are worse things than staring at the water as you're posing for a picture.

Jack:

Take four.

Henry:

Well, there are worse things than staring at the water as you're posing for a picture after sleeping on the ferry, after getting up at Seven, to come over to an island on the middle of a river, half an hour from the city, on a Sunday. And I still wasn't good enough. Well, there are worse things than staring at the water as you're posing for a picture, rather sleeping on the ferry, after getting up at seven to come over to an island in the middle of the river, half an hour from the city, on a Sunday better.

Henry:

Still didn't have great breath control on on a Sunday.

Jack:

Did you know? I know the best.

Henry:

Control was fine on the Main words but I didn't hold enough in for on a Sunday, and then Annali Astrid does this on a Sunday.

Jack:

Well, next time, let's get her on.

Jack:

Oh my god, i'd love to have Annali Astrid on because, quite frankly, i don't think I can sit through you doing that seven times. Why are we doing this, though? So, obviously, if you're listening in advance, you'll be like, well, i didn't realize they'd, you know, release this on a Sunday, but we thought this is a little bit of bonus content for you, because, as you may have heard, if you've listened to some of our previous episodes and if you haven't, why not go back and listen to them? but If you, if you haven't, we are turning the tables.

Jack:

So we've sat down across this season one of the all-exclusive across spring, slash summer 23 and we've taken various members of the Potter's resorts Team members mostly from Hopton on C, but we will get over to Five Lakes at some point And we've been interviewing them on their perfect potters break.

Henry:

We have.

Jack:

Jack, it's been. It's been a lovely little journey. It's been a lot of fun but now the tables have turned on to us.

Henry:

Terrifyingly. I can't describe how weird it felt. No one will ever get this, but and we haven't actually recorded Jack's episode yet- And. I'm still waiting for you to realize.

Jack:

I already know how it is, already feel how strange it's gonna be. I thought that I knew how it would feel, how wrong I was but surprise, surprise, your episode Recording went on so long, yes, that we've had to cut it into two parts but, This, this, this, this first part, is an interesting one And I think we wanted to release it. But also, you know, we wanted to give you your main Monday all-exclusive content, but this is like a little bit of bonus content.

Henry:

Yeah well, similar to Mark's episode, this one kind of starts with a bit of my, my backstory, my Weird and wild backstory, and I think it's really interesting.

Jack:

I obviously, being Colleagues, we have discussed this in the past.

Henry:

Some of these topics We're really close to saying friends, there weren't you, jack. No I think you're getting closer as we go on.

Jack:

But it was. I think it's really interesting and it's it's just, it's, it's a, it's a wonderful little story to do Of your journey, of how you made it here.

Henry:

Did you just call me interesting?

Jack:

I Made the whole podcast infrastructure has just collapsed. Did I do that? I'm not sure that.

Henry:

Zach, do you think I'm interesting?

Jack:

Yes, Well, there we go. We all know what Zach thinks about that, but it is. It is interesting, i suppose. I mean you're not often interesting, but this is this, that episode Listening back. This is the anomaly.

Henry:

Yeah, and what we haven't mentioned, by the way, jack, in this episode so far, it's who's joining us? Yes, mark Brewer.

Jack:

Oh yeah, we haven't has a risen.

Henry:

He has he wasn't dead, but he was on holiday a whizzen He has a whizzen To join us, because we didn't want to have just two people, because no one wants to just hear myself and Jack.

Jack:

I mean, that's exactly what we're doing right now, isn't it?

Henry:

It would just be one link, it would be a very long Intro, but this being a two-parter, jack, should we just stop the dilly-dallying if you would like to, if that's important to you because I'm conscious it is important to me, jack, but I'm conscious that I'd like this episode to can I just say something?

Jack:

so I know you're trying to get into that, but people may. I don't know if people pick up on these little little tidbits of sayings that we have right, but if that's important to you, is one of the ones that has grown and grown into our, into our vocabulary, isn't?

Henry:

it, it's a standard.

Jack:

It's just little tiny Phrases and sentences we throw in to make the other person laugh, don't mean it Usually succeeds without fail. I did it last night, didn't I? you really got me last night. What was the it was.

Henry:

If that's important, yeah it was if that's important to you. And you just, you just ran at me saying it and that was what really got me.

Jack:

So yes, every now and then you may have noticed that we say if that's important.

Henry:

I will now continue with the Podcast Jack if that's important to you. It is press play. Maybe you should say press play for this episode.

Jack:

What?

Henry:

Because it's me This is a big moment.

Jack:

This is because he's. Every time I've tried to press play, henry has not let me know, don't look at, just say it No, no, no.

Henry:

Here is episode 14.

Jack:

Oh what, what one keep adding these little bits in part one of the all exclusive podcast Press play Hard to fail. Yeah, it was okay. How does it feel being in the other chair, Henry?

Henry:

Jack, it's so weird. Yeah, It's really quite daunting seeing yourself and Mark Brewer sit in front of me.

Mark:

And I'm excited because obviously I've been listening to you too Incredible, you've got to say. Your exclusives interviews have been spot on. I've enjoyed all of them. To actually then turn round and now suddenly think we can turn the tables and find out a little bit more of Henry, bit more of Jack Henry is a little bit like an open book, because we've known you for a long time.

Henry:

This is very true, Mark.

Mark:

Compared to Jack is a bit of a mystery.

Henry:

I find that really is a mystery because, we don't know Jack as a kid.

Mark:

We don't know him, But we knew you as a child Henry.

Henry:

We don't even know if Jack is who he says he is really.

Mark:

Are you?

Henry:

Jack.

Jack:

Jenkins, not willing to divulge that sort of information right now.

Henry:

No, fair enough.

Mark:

Wouldn't you actually answer those questions?

Henry:

Maybe next week Next week we can ask Jack where he came from. I just had to run back to get the SD card and I saw the remnants of last night's event left in my room.

Jack:

What happened last night? What happened?

Henry:

Oh no, i didn't tell you.

Mark:

Well, no, you obviously didn't. We're both sitting here doing like what event.

Henry:

So I walked into my room and I went into my bathroom and in the bungalows the staff bungalows the bathroom is like in the middle of both rooms And I walked into the bathroom There was this fly, this massive fly.

Mark:

A big blue bottle fly A massive fly.

Jack:

This is quite interesting because last time we recorded the introductions for the previous episode, the 10,000 download special.

Henry:

Oh yeah, That's true.

Mark:

It kept circling, henry and kept flying into your head. No, it did So. it's your personal fly.

Henry:

So this fly was in my bathroom. It was enormous, okay. So I tried to really nicely, you know, put it in a little, put it in a box and then put it out the window in the rainstorm. That would have probably killed it. But I put it in a Jomalone box, but I couldn't catch it in the box, so I abandoned the box and then, i kid you not, as soon as I tried to stop it in this box, it tries to attack me. Now, i didn't think flies could attack, but I'm telling you they can. So do you think it was a wasp?

Jack:

No, it was an actual fly. It's a fly. I'm not going to go through to the puffin and mag, but I'll debate again. Was it a wasp or was it a fly?

Henry:

So anyway, this fly, it literally started dive bombing at me.

Jack:

Like.

Henry:

I was actually about to kind of concede and let it win and go and stay somewhere else for the night and say, okay, fine.

Jack:

You really got driven out of your accommodation by a fly Did you resist the temptation of rolling up a newspaper and bashing it.

Henry:

Not because I like flies, because I would do it, but because Ed recently painted my walls white and the fly would have gotten all over the walls. And also it's just a bit gruesome to then see the bits of fly, the act of doing it, and fine, doing that, because they're annoying, aren't they? But they're then seeing the fly with all of its legs like this.

Jack:

Splat A description for a podcast. You just sort of flared his arms and legs up in the air.

Mark:

Do you know what technique I do?

Jack:

What do you do, Mark?

Mark:

I get a wet flannel or not a flannel, but they are wet A tea towel, they get wet, so it's a little bit heavier, yes, but what's the difference?

Jack:

I get the wetness, the wetness, the concept that we get.

Mark:

Because then and it's large enough, so because flies know that you can creep up on a fly, but they always know when you just backed the pounce. But if you throw a great big wet towel or wet flannel at it, it doesn't go splat, It looks like it seems to capture it, knock it to the floor and then do what you want to do with it. Sometimes I'm very cruel because it's a blue bottle and then big old flies I accidentally stand on it.

Henry:

That was horrible.

Mark:

It is horrible, really.

Jack:

It was quite a descriptive.

Mark:

Well, but I do celebrate it because I really miss, i really miss.

Jack:

That's quite an interesting tactic.

Henry:

I then used another tactic. So Jack has a Henry Hoover which he actually stole from someone else Whoa, whoa, whoa, but I've stolen it from Jack and I borrowed it Stolen.

Mark:

It There's no way to You talk about our cleaners, our daytime cleaners, henry.

Henry:

No, actually it was all cleaners, henry, but we can't say who's, henry, it was because it was from a different department.

Jack:

Okay, and we took it. Jack took it.

Henry:

We will return it Eventually one day Anyway.

Mark:

And you've chased the blue bottle And I then chased it and it was about 20 minutes.

Henry:

I broke a sweat by the end. It was about 20 minutes of chasing this fly and our bathrooms aren't big.

Jack:

No, they're not very big Chasing this fly.

Henry:

It was the fastest thing I've ever seen. It was like a spitfire.

Jack:

You don't move particularly quickly, though, do you?

Henry:

No, I do when there's a fly attacking me. But you talked 20 minutes.

Henry:

Yeah, the fly was You never filmed any of this.

Mark:

Well, there we go.

Jack:

So you went for the. That's a little bit more torturous, though. I just want to say Mark's approach to waterboarding the fly is much more preferable.

Mark:

Did you think you was going to last a year? No, i mean, quite honestly, none of us did. I was hoping you wouldn't. I see, that's the difference. Jack was hoping that you was going. I was thinking like I'd be really surprised that Henry survives a year with us. Yeah, let alone. Now we're looking at year two.

Henry:

I know It's crazy, isn't it? I didn't. This is very different to anything I've ever done before, so it's very different.

Jack:

I've got two questions for you Yeah. I mean, what do you think has allowed you or kept you going this past year? What would you say, you and Mark?

Mark:

Really Genuinely, what a lovely thought. Genuinely, you and Mark, it's not the bar staff, then Them too, because you love the staff, don't you?

Henry:

I do yes.

Mark:

I mean, who's to know that he roams potters at two o'clock and three o'clock in the morning? Four o'clock in the morning, so I'm talking in the morning, just talking to Whatever staff is around that's left that he sits and talks. Security staff cleaners.

Henry:

Like a kind of salt gritter when it's snowing and they come through in the early hours of the morning to go and clean the roads and they make everything safe for everyone. That's what I do in the early hours of the morning The resort salt gritter.

Mark:

Let's go back to the fact that we have known you since coming to potters.

Jack:

As a child, as a child, yes, and I always say you were one of the child children that got left behind.

Mark:

Thank, you, jack, not many, But you used to come with mum sometimes, nan.

Henry:

I did, yes. Mum and Grandma, who last week I told the story of how I stole from my Grandma.

Mark:

Who did, did you?

Henry:

Yes, she's still never forgiven me for that, although she did get me these trousers.

Jack:

They look like pajama bottoms. They're not pajamas, they do look like pajama bottoms, don't they?

Mark:

Well, they don't like normal trousers. No, they don't look like too posh to be with a t-shirt. I mean, that's my point. If you had a shirt, i'd go along with that. Ok, it's a t-shirt.

Henry:

They're from the New Ralph. It's a Japanese t-shirt.

Henry:

Yeah, it is.

Mark:

Right.

Henry:

But these are from the New Ralph Lauren preps to range, i think, for Wimbledon. these were released.

Jack:

Wonderful.

Mark:

Yeah, but you don't do tennis, henry.

Henry:

I don't do tennis. No, you don't do sport. I don't do many sports. Well, i grew up on a riding school. My Mum used to have a riding school, and then I'd always kind of grown up around horses really, but that was the only sporting I ever got near, was equestrian things.

Mark:

Could we say that you're not really good at riding either, though?

Henry:

Riding No no-transcript, but I never really kept kept at it.

Jack:

Yeah, when was the last time you you've ridden?

Henry:

Probably.

Henry:

That's a really good question, probably when I was like nine, there's what I mean.

Jack:

That's quite a while ago, then 10 years ago.

Henry:

But I would still know what I'm doing.

Jack:

Yeah, what, what? she just just haven't done it. Were there any reason why you stopped?

Mark:

Do they scare you?

Jack:

I think horses particularly scare me to death. I don't know if I've ever told this story. I was like horses. Yeah, i quite scary. I always remember the story, right when I was I was like a toddler And I, i remember I found it quite funny, but I was. I think I was with my mom and my grandma And we went I wouldn't. I went off on a walk or something, went and saw a horse and the horse went over the head like a fence and lifted me up. It grabbed me by the hood of my jacket and lifted me into the air. Apparently my grandma was. You know, he's, you know, in hysterics worrying about me And my mom found it hilarious.

Jack:

No, but I would find that hilarious, it was there was little toddler me just dangling in the air, finding it very funny as well.

Henry:

I know, i've never. I don't understand people who have a fear of horses, i guess because they say big, but I? there's a photo of me at two weeks old. I sat on a horse.

Mark:

But that's why you have no fear. No, i've literally to our to us. The nearest thing we ever got to was like going to the beach and then riding a donkey. That's the closest we ever got to a four-legged.

Henry:

Yeah, no, i'm. You can put me next to a 15 hands beast and I will 15 hands.

Jack:

Wow, yeah, and I can. That's the unit of measurement for a horse. Right, it is Yeah. I think it's something on my bucket list. I've never ridden a horse. I don't think, and I think maybe they would like to once, maybe. Yeah, well, we can do that.

Henry:

Jack, we can get my mom to teach us, yeah.

Mark:

I think that's good. I think that's something you should do.

Henry:

But no, we moved out of the riding school. then, when I was like four I think that was when Princess Anne came to visit us. the thing Of course she did She did use our Lou. Well, she came for a visit, naturally, to the, to the, to the, to the, to the, to the, to the yard, to to the yard, and there's a photo of me giving her some flowers. And then she used our Lou and we put a little plaque above it, a very tasteful plaque, a little blue plaque that said the Royal Throne.

Mark:

Oh, that's chavon.

Henry:

I like that, yeah, and then it had the date that she used it on And I think we still carry that plaque around with us, even though not every throne is the Royal Throne but we have moved out of there now, so yeah.

Mark:

So without getting too into all your family.

Henry:

Yeah.

Mark:

Because obviously you've you've you talk better than all of us. You was brought up, it's not?

Jack:

difficult. So some of the standards of talking here.

Henry:

It's not taking me out of my way of talking.

Mark:

But no, i mean, how far do we want to go? back to the fact that We can get back to school. You went back to school. We knew about your boarding school.

Henry:

Yeah, and you just wanted to get rid of you. Not exactly. So I went to a school in Buckinghamshire. I never had a great time at school, i, and it kind of all goes back to sport really. but I was one of these annoying children who would constantly kind of question the teachers, as both you can probably imagine.

Mark:

It makes sense to us how we would infuriate a teacher by questioning the answer. Is that really?

Henry:

I was very irritating, but I was more interested in musicals and I remember you like when I was four or five and I was at this school.

Mark:

Sorry, i'm going to try. Does that come from Nan Gran Mum?

Jack:

or Inquisitiveness, i mean where did the musical side.

Mark:

One of the musical side, i mean like most children pick up like my children are all soley into music.

Henry:

Yeah.

Mark:

And all types, because obviously they've grown up through.

Henry:

So Mum, while she was pregnant, listened to loads of like musical albums and compilations and I reckon that was probably that. that was probably it. But I watched Chicago when I was like five the film of that Interesting choice.

Jack:

Yeah, i know.

Henry:

And I remember going in to school Wearing a leotard black leotard, Black fish tarts. I actually did, i think, have a rock dress.

Henry:

But singing all that jazz and Roxy and when you're good, to Mumma. And my mum got a phone call from school saying yeah, i think maybe stick to you know, joseph, and cats for musical choices for your four year old son. But I was hearing none of it because I would find a cast recording and put it on. And then I was, you know, would be sat in a mass lesson making a Phantom of the Opera mask and instead of doing that, i would, you know, be designing my Phantom mask. But school didn't love me for that at all.

Henry:

Then the worst side of it was the kind of rugby and the sports side I decided when I was like eight or nine because we only lived like half an hour from the school, but it was a boarding school where you could choose to either be a day student or a boarder and all of my friends were in a dorm. So I decided to go and join them. So by choice I started boarding And that side of it was so fun. But then the side that wasn't fun at all was games and rugby, and I was just terrible at that. It was something that I was so disinterested in and to be forced into doing it, which is I get part of how these education systems work. But then I had this awful teacher. For the sake of this podcast, i'm going to call Mr Shorts, but he Austrian.

Jack:

There's always war shorts.

Henry:

Yes, but he was just the most repulsive man in the world He would. You know, because I got so anxious about doing rugby and stuff, because I hated it so much, hated the mouth guard, hated every single part of it. I would often hide behind trees, which is actually what I do here, when I get rated on family rounders.

Mark:

But one day, some guests are going to record you. They're going to find me behind the tree. They will be looking for you now?

Henry:

Yeah, but because I got so anxious it would take me forever in the changing rooms to change it out of my games kit and he would keep me behind in my breaks and make me change it out of it like 50 times and time me, which just led me to become so anxious, which led to me getting a stammer when I was like nine, which was terrible for a while. It isn't too bad now. It comes out occasionally, but it was so awful like took me two minutes to say a sentence.

Jack:

It's not nice that those sort of things do stick with you.

Mark:

No, And also, of course, today a lot of children would.

Henry:

It would never happen today, just wouldn't happen today, because mental health is so awareness, i mean With children, anxiety and anything I think that's true to an extent, but I think there's a lot of work to still be done at some of these schools, because I was often told you know, this was a private work. This was a private boarding school in the middle of Buckinghamshire that were only really focused on acceptance rates into Eaton and sport and that was the only two things they really cared about. I was into being creative and into theatre and stuff like that, and every time I was trying to express that I'd be told, no, you're useless, you're not going to get anywhere, you know by teachers.

Mark:

No.

Henry:

Of course, and it was just awful. So, kind of halfway through that, as a coping mechanism, my mum, at this point, has always She's always had her own business and has had her own businesses and things like that, and she started a sweet business in 2013. And I think as a kind of coping mechanism to just try and escape the school thing, i was like, oh, can I design some sweets? And she was like, yeah, yeah, sure, and she Let me design some jars of sweets. And I designed some kind of jar of modern worms which was like a kind of themed like chocolate logs and chocolate raisins with jelly worms and stuff like that, and I kind of sold them to my grandma initially and then, as things kind of went on, started to sell them to family and friends. And Then my mom has always been as you know, jack, because she's helped us out with bits of this podcast- actually has.

Jack:

Yeah, she's been wonderful.

Henry:

She's. She's always been great at PR and marketing and things like that. She used to work in that and does again now, actually. But She she taught me how to write a press release because she thought, oh be nice if you know This gets mentioned at a local paper that he's doing you know these sweets and things like that. And I called the business not before tea, because it was what my grandma was used to say when I asked for sweets. So I wrote this press release that she taught me to write and just kind of sent it off into the world and A few days later it was on page three of the Daily Mail.

Mark:

And of course it would be.

Jack:

Yeah, and I'm just how that happens.

Mark:

Yeah, how old you know?

Henry:

I was nine, nine, yeah and this Daily Mail journalist came to the house To interview me and take a few photos. There is this horrific photo of me. It taught me a very valuable life lesson of don't do you exactly what a photographer tells you to do. Because he got out this little tube of bril cream and, you know, said oh yeah, just stick your hair back. And I put on a suit and I don't really do suits, as you both know from the pre-shows yes, and.

Henry:

There's this horrific photo of me. He wanted me looking like Gordon gecko from the Wolf of Wall Street.

Jack:

Yes, and it is a pretty terrible photo, I mean, I think I think you think it's worse than it is. No, it is bad but, it is a bad photo, but I think you've got this, this thing about it, but I mean it was tongue-tongued.

Henry:

Cheek The image you wanted to give a cross led to 10,000 comments on the mail online with death threats. Yeah, and you know comments saying you know some fairly humorous ones thinking about it now, with all that money You'd think you'd get his teeth fixed and You know he looks like he's eaten his profits as one of them. But you know just all of these comments that eventually they got taken down. But you know That was good. That came out of it too. Of course, we launched a site, a website with the sweets on and, by the way, we had 32 jars of sweets at this point. Our entire What kind of stock was 32 jars.

Henry:

Yeah we had 70,000 hits to the site. Yeah we had 32 jars of sweets. Yeah and we were just thinking if we could charge every person one pound to enter that site We'd be a very good profit. but we had 32 jars, So the website completely crashed, but it started this kind of frenzy of Media attention.

Jack:

Yeah, really and obviously you sort of put out that some of that is Was was sort of negative attention as well, which is is never sort of Um, well, it's never, never nice and that sort of stuff does stay with you. But how do you find you've you've coped with that moving forward? How do you? because it has it taught you some lessons? Oh my god. Yeah, i, because you got to look at the positive in those sort of situations having you up. Why is it sort of eats you up? That was at a time.

Henry:

I think where it was, school was being really negative. My teachers were being awful and at that point as well, the parents of My kind of peers at school were also being pretty vile as well, because they were. They were really disapproving and you know we're really kind of Horrible to me and my mom about the business side of things, so like, oh, a child shouldn't be doing this. You know, in their eyes Tilly just has to help with the a car to shop when it comes in and kind of unload that. But they were just awful, i mean really Disapproving and judgmental and you know, to focused about what type of goo dessert they're gonna buy next, to kind of focus on the reality of life. So it was like kind of being attacked at all sides from that. But it was the It bought me so much happiness, the business side of it when I was doing it.

Henry:

Yeah, i think it was that thing of do I either Like this is really easy to stop, and I think this was the decision, and I remember having this chat with my mom. It was like It's, it's, it's really easy to end all of this net, like all of this negativity, you just stop doing it, but or do I just I Guess it sounds like a cliche but do I just rise above it and just park all of that and accept it and just kind of move on? And I'm not really sure, because as a nine-year-old thinking back on it now, that's a big, it's a big decision.

Jack:

Big decision to me, i suppose, when that's the only thing offering you any comfort and any like you know, escape it. I think that's it. Roll with it.

Mark:

You just roll with it. Yeah, your mum would have sort of guided you into that totally Well, no one leaves a nine-year-old to make that big decision, do they?

Henry:

well, she certainly didn't push me into making a decision, and I think the worst thing that she could have done would be to Force me to keep going.

Henry:

You know, do that. And she was really like I don't want you to do this if it's gonna Hurt you. And you know, of course we took all the measures to protect that in terms of getting those comments taken down and things like that. But It was me who really pushed to keep doing it. You know, my parents were both usually concerned about kind of that side of it, but it was me who pushed to keep on going because I was like no, i'm not gonna let Sandra from Hull Kind of stop, stop what I'm doing now.

Jack:

Damn that, sandra from.

Henry:

Sancho from holes. Awful, isn't she? Um, thinking back at now.

Mark:

Actually, to say that to a nine-year-old is pretty yeah, yeah pretty awful, but but you see, when did you start coming to potters then?

Henry:

that was all about the same time And it was kind of potters as well. That and I give potters a Huge amount of credit for this is for my love of performing, because I remember, you know, i, you mark would always get me up on stage to do various things. I remember when I was a bit older, in like 2015, when Hamilton first came out doing a performance of Everybody loved that introduction. It's on the family green.

Jack:

Yeah.

Mark:

This, but he was almost to us. I mean to advocate, we are, you know, we we sort of in, jack will do it, you will learn to do as well. And with that, any child that comes up says, can I sing a song? We almost try and say, yeah, of course you can, we'll try and fit, we're trying to range it and, and You know, you were always that little special child who's actually came out, said I want to sing, lay, miserable. I went, pardon, and this is when he was probably 89. And then we managed to have a duet with Rachel And you said to I dream the dream or something like that, in harmony or something. You did it for that. And of course we don't normally get, let alone It wasn't a girl boy wanting to sing dramatic West End songs. And then when you did appear, and so I know Hamilton, well, to be honest, none of us knew Hamilton.

Mark:

At that time we didn't know what Hamilton was and then you just wrapped this incredible Raffle. You know it's like it was 12 minutes and we were looking at it. Of course, we played on it We just actually went and had a cup of tea, got an ice cream, came back and he was still on and just let everyone see that It's still going which song to do so.

Henry:

I spent about half an hour in my room Creating a track that was a 12 minute medley.

Jack:

Of all the songs, of all the songs, because when you can't decide on one, do them all.

Henry:

Going back to school actually, which I won't go on for the whole time, but but I had this wonderful music teacher called mr Pratton who actually through all of that time at the school was the one thing keeping me going.

Henry:

And We saw an advert for the junior choral courses, which is the junior version of the Eaton choral courses Which is run by Ralph Wood and Martin Ford, and That was at Wellington College and I kind of went there when I was nine as well and I think I had reservations going because it was another school like experience And for me that was like the worst thing in the world But it was music, so I kind of trusted that And actually it was the junior choral courses was the only experience, i think, where I had a teacher like role model who I really respected and got on with and who really saw me as a valued, not student but just a valued person. And the junior choral courses, which is amazing at that, we were singing for like kind of 12 hours a day for seven days, various things in Latin pop songs, choral music, opera, musical theatre, just so much content and they were just amazing. And it reminded me of Potters actually, because it kind of had this amazing sense of family there.

Mark:

How many children was doing this?

Henry:

Well, it ranges, the choral courses You can have like 60 children or it can go up to kind of 110. But they still go and honestly, anyone who has someone under 18 or is it 16, a kind of young person who enjoys singing, it's so amazing And honestly, it doesn't matter. I'd never sung choral music before but I just kind of learnt on the job, which is something I'm kind of used to now because it's I think those sort of things are.

Jack:

They are more than just invaluable, because I listened to other podcasts as well. believe it or not, but I was listening to one recently that sort of said successful people, nine times out of ten even maybe more than that to some extent always have a role model or this figure in their life that have shown them some level of support and some level of belief. You need that sort of one person to see something in you, to be able to see something in yourself.

Jack:

Oh 100% And that's more valuable. but it goes sort of much further than that, because I suppose if you went to this choral course then you find a connection with these like-minded people And those sort of clubs and groups are so valuable as well.

Henry:

Well, they were just as weird as me, and that was what was great about it. And Ralph forward Dr Ralph forward MBE is this hugely eccentric conductor. He's an amazing guy. And Martin Ford also just this hilarious person. All of the staff there, which is amazing. And I do have my grandma and granddad to thank for that as well, because they kind of allowed me to go on those courses.

Henry:

But again, mr Pratton at school, my music teacher. He was the one thing at that school that kept me going. And in 2013, i came back after the Christmas holidays to find out that he'd passed away And that led to this huge downward spiral at school. I was this close to being kicked out of that school. I mean, i'd already been expelled from a school when I was four because I was like inquisitive and would constantly challenge stuff like that. You know my relationship with school has been horrific, but you know it was music, it was the business side of it which really helped with that And, yeah, that kind of just managed to grow and grow And as I was coming to Potters and doing that, i was doing other things Eventually left that school. So I left the school in Buckinghamshire when I was 10 or 11.

Henry:

And at that point I decided my mom kind of homeschooled me for a bit And my mom, bless her, was not the greatest teacher when it comes to academia, but we had one attempted lesson which was taking me to the Natural History Museum and seeing a stuffed rat, and I think after that we were like, yeah, that's.

Henry:

I kind of started to fill some of my time with writing stories and stuff like that And I wrote a story about an owl and a mouse who run a sweet shop because I was thinking, well, i can relate to that. And with some Christmas money which wasn't a lot from my grandma, we got a few copies of this book printed like a really limited run. I started to sell those and we already had some media attention from the sweets And eventually that kind of grew and grew and grew until there was this huge media frenzy of being in Forbes magazine and every newspaper and BBC News and ITV News and Australian radio stations and American shows. It was just this crazy frenzy And I guess, growing up in the world of merchandising, we then started to create products around that, like wash bags with the characters on and things like that And all of these products. And it was just then. Suddenly you're kind of there and you're thinking, oh my goodness, what have I done?

Mark:

And you're only about 11 now.

Henry:

Yeah.

Jack:

This is just ridiculous, because I think at 11 I was still wanting to be James Bond, which is like you know it seems like you always.

Mark:

Your biggest event at 11 was leaving school primary school to go to your senior school. I still wanted to be the Phantom of the Opera, though at this point, so I was doing that whilst being the Phantom.

Jack:

But it's weird how you usually take an idea and it snobles and that's quite a beautiful. It was an organic thing and people always.

Henry:

You know some people would always judge and go because I think it's easy and I do fully understand this 100% because I do hear myself. People don't think I do, but I do. You know, you can see this and you'll think, oh well, he had loads of help because you know he went to a private school and he's this and he's that and his family's this and his family's that. I can honestly say this wasn't the case. This wasn't my family pumping money into something at all. It was purely me and my parents.

Mark:

You failed schools, didn't you?

Henry:

Oh, i was hopeless at school, you know, absolutely hopeless, not because I was unintelligent, i just didn't care Like I just couldn't care less about maths. I mean just really couldn't. We just kind of led ourselves through it and somehow it worked. This business thing, it was literally through Googling. How do you publish a book? So we self-published this book. It was called The Adventures of Sherbin Pip, still in print today. It was kind of at that point where we got a call from the BBC asking, oh, we'd love to have Henry on The One Show, and I went, oh my God, that's really cool. And they then said, yeah, we'd like to have him on the sofa with Richard Branson. I was thinking, oh, okay, yeah, sure.

Mark:

And of course, i suppose, at your age. I mean, if someone said to me now you're going to go and have to sit and talk with Richard Branson At my age it would petrify me. Yeah, But as a child you've probably.

Henry:

Just You don't think about these things, do you? I'm more thinking I'm going to go to BBC Studios and see a TARDIS. That was kind of what I was thinking of, and I did see the TARDIS. Yeah, the thought now of going and speak to Richard Branson about business. You think, oh, that's quite daunting. But no, i did it and I gave him a copy of my book, which he then asked me to sign. So you know, there's a photo of me signing a book for Richard Branson, which is just He's just a lovely man.

Jack:

He's the nicest person Read and listened and watched things. No, totally, he's just.

Henry:

And he's been so supportive of me. He's written a few blogs about me and stuff And you know that just means so, so much. And he plays another part in the story later which I'm trying to speed through by the way because I get that there are other things that we want to talk about No, no, no.

Jack:

As far as listeners are asleep by now, We can talk what we want. This is like kind of calm.

Henry:

Yeah, calm as a little has that.

Henry:

You know. I'm just going to keep talking until someone's got eight hours of sleep comfortably in.

Jack:

Yes, And then at the end there's going to be the sound of a cock crawl. We might have enough material to see us through to season two at this point.

Mark:

And we knew this as you coming to Potters, because you used to say I've written a book. And when you say, yeah, of course you have, henry, of course you have. And you know it was our sort of Yeah, it's just And then it shows the book, And then we go oh, thank you. And then you wrote a book about his business.

Henry:

Well, yeah, that kind of comes shortly really, because after that and you used kind of the snowballing term earlier, Jack, and it is very much that you know after the one show, it then just kept on growing and growing and growing. We were then stocked in, I think over almost 300 stockists worldwide. Not before tea as a brand, We then launched, Well, we then opened our own shop on a high street, which was just amazing As a child to walk into something and you know, see, oh my goodness, this is like my own shop with my products and with my book there and all of this stuff. This is a bit of a tangent, but it's not rare for me to do this.

Henry:

So it is the first one we got approached by a Production company who at that time wasn't huge. Um Called netflix to um To turn not before to turn the ventures of sherbet pit my book into an animation. And you know, this is one of those things this is, i'm not afraid of failing, and this is very valuable life lesson in that they We were very far down the pipeline. We signed a contract for the rights for the book to be turned into an animation for A considerable amount of money, i mean.

Henry:

We're talking, millions are we talking in the high tens of millions. So, yeah, we had it there and then there was a problem with one of the producers who had a personal issue And the deal had to fall through. Basically, it was either continue it and sign the rights away and Not really know what's going to happen. So it was a kind of pulling out, but also it fell through and it was one of those things of like Don't celebrate something until it's yeah, i mean, i don't, i'm, i'm.

Jack:

I'm actually thankful that the order to go through I was going to say genuinely obviously life would be completely different, right?

Henry:

I don't know where I'd be. You wouldn't be here. No, i without a doubt I certainly wouldn't, and I don't know, i'd be happy where it was, you know, to be presented with that and of course my parents wouldn't have said his x million pounds have it. No but you know it's, it's, i'm, i'm, i'm very glad I didn't have that, because I still have to. If I want a pair of Peruvian cotton trousers, i still have to say for that, you know.

Jack:

Yeah. Um which I do often want the pair of Peruvian.

Henry:

At this point I still very much had my stammer. I was still struggling with that hugely And tried speech therapy, but that just wouldn't work.

Henry:

the one place I never stammered was on stage, and I really found that a pot as well common thing for a lot of people very much say it is the beauty of performing and even if you're performing as yourself, you still have, and we always say when we're on stage, of course we're ourselves, but we're an amplified version of ourselves. You know, it may shock people to know I don't actually leave the stage and talk about right now, actually do you? No, he does do that Yeah you know, we will have our on stage personas which aren't dishonest to ourselves, but they're heightened versions of our own personality and I think No.

Mark:

everyone has that idea in the head and I don't know how many times Claire, my wife, actually gets asked how do you put up with him at?

Henry:

home. You're fairly quiet at home, but I'm really am quite, yeah, i actually and my kids didn't know that I was funny. My kids They still don't actually.

Mark:

It was a shock. but it was only till they come and saw an unleashed late in later in time that they said dad, i never knew you was this funny. We were very aware that you had a stamp. Yeah, we just did refuse to bring it up at any time. People think like me, but we knew you as a child.

Henry:

Well, we were like a speech impediment showcase mark me and you, because we were like a.

Mark:

You had to cheat to correct me.

Jack:

Yes, it's a shame I wasn't there, because I was needed more than ever Just to correct people's speech.

Henry:

It was at that time and at this point I'm probably 11. And I was asked to do a public speaking event A really small public speaking event in somewhere in the Midlands in a conference center, at an event for entrepreneurs who are also mums, and I did a kind of 20 minute presentation there about my story and my stammages didn't happen And I would always start my talks with a lot of different stammers. If I do stammage, just go and get a coffee and I might be done by then And you know that would always at least break the ice.

Henry:

But if I do have a moment of not being able to speak, then we're all good.

Henry:

There was someone at that event and a few more events that kind of kept on coming, and then they said oh, would you like to come and do an event? I'm the events manager for retail week, which is a retail publication, and it was retail week, live 2016. And I was like yeah, sure, send me over the details. So they send over the details and I'm scrolling at yeah, this is great, this is great. And the venue I look at the venue, it's the O2 arena, of course, just thinking right, okay, but things like I still don't do.

Mark:

Well that that one did it Because 11.

Henry:

I think you know, i was always conscious that I could stammer and then it's like, oh, okay, that's the O2. So I did that and during my, during my presentation to the likes of the CEOs of Apple and Google and all the dragons from Dragons Den And you know things like that I brought Twitter down. What The hashtag froze? because people were tweeting about it so much, yeah, that their Twitter events board completely went down. Which was a huge, huge compliment, but one of those surreal moments where the compare of the event.

Henry:

Declan Curry came on stage afterwards for the Q&A which people were talking about And he just said you've broken Twitter. Yeah, cool is that? Yeah, but after the O2 one, a company called Success.

Jack:

Resources.

Henry:

Well, actually a friend of ours, renata, who worked for Success Resources, who do all the Tony Robbins events, who's a motivational speaker, and Gary V and people like that. And she said, oh, come to this event at Excel in London And have a chat with some of my my kind of colleagues. And we spoke to them And I didn't really know what I was, getting myself self involved because it was out of Tony Robbins event. And Tony Robbins is this incredible speaker who is really empowering, almost evangelical in his delivery And what is he?

Henry:

talking about? He's talking about self motivation, things like that. I saw that, and then they they saw me on to do a tour of Asia. And what was your talk about?

Jack:

What was your?

Henry:

So it was part, so it was kind of about my story. It was about the business. It was about tips that I've learned and the challenges that I've overcome being a school, being my stammer, things like that, leading myself through it, kind of doing it blindly, with no experience, and, and I was like, oh, i'm going to do it With no experience and and and I guess how I got through that, which applies not just to other young people but also to some adults as well. You know, i did a tour around Asia which was just the weirdest, most incredible thing. You know The security for these, because it's insane seven bodyguards for the tour, flying business and, first around the world, massive billboards in Singapore, you know, and things like that, which which is just Insane, mental, i mean insane. But I think it never went to my head because I think you then always land at Heathrow and Suddenly there's no security or shakers there and you're thinking that's back to normality.

Mark:

Did mom come with you?

Henry:

She did, she did and we had an amazing time you know, it was Kind of like Roxie on her tour said boy George, i guess is it's you kind of have to separate these things? you know you never take that for granted And you always have to be aware that that's not real life. you know, real life is not being flown around in first class. Having seven bodyguards Checking for bombs in toilets that's not normality. What is not getting that treatment either?

Henry:

No, no, no, i'm kidding, you know you know, people weren't allowed in a lift with me. Yeah you know it was the strangest thing. They I couldn't enter a room until they had cleared it. It was, and you know, there was a guard outside of my hotel room door. We weren't allowed to leave the hotel without security. We managed to escape the hotel once, which was very exciting prospect in Vietnam But managed to see these amazing parts of the world and meet amazing people.

Jack:

I think people are interested in what those certain tips you know. If you've got any that you could, you could sort of say what parts of what you were talking about, some of those tips.

Henry:

One of the big things that I would talk about is school, and it's school is not everything.

Henry:

And seizing the moment when it comes to you, you know, thinking And this is advice for parents as well is like if, if you're and I really beg people to listen to this, because it is the only way that I've managed to get out of a really, really dark place is if you see your child as a passion for something, please, please, embrace it. That doesn't mean give up your whole life for it and it doesn't mean you know school. Of course I'm not saying school is not important, but it isn't everything. Getting A's and or nines in your GCSE's is not the be all and end all of life. And I think learning to seize the moment and embrace the opportunity if you're a really keen football player and opportunity comes up for you to go to a football camp or whatever, take it, just take it and not saying no to opportunities. You know I had a stammer and was asked to do a speaking tour. Now, speaking was not my strongest talent, you know. I could barely get a sentence together. I kind of learned so much on that tour and Eventually decided to write because people would always ask, almost like you did, for a condensed version of that. So I wrote a book called Young and Mighty, which was my journey with business tips and things like that And with people that I've met along the way, like Sir Richard Branson he featured in it. I interviewed them, some of the dragons from Dragon's Den, the founder of Instagram, sports people, cameron McIntosh, the producer, some of the original cast of Hamilton You know people from all professions, models, everything.

Henry:

Then COVID happened And I wouldn't say I stopped doing that side of it. I think I always had a passion for theatre And I think during COVID maybe I saw that was the avenue I wanted to go down. And this is the big thing as well is like changing your mind of plans is fine, and I guess that's another. That's something that was never really in my talks but would be now Because I've, i've, i've swerved a million times like what I want to do And changing your mind is so, so fine. You know it's interesting. Your plans change, yeah.

Jack:

And again I listened to this other podcast about pursuing what it is you want to do And it is OK to to move on or to quit and to do to pursue something else you've got, because otherwise you do, it can depress you and it can get you into a weird you know dark place.

Henry:

Some would see not doing that anymore as as failing is giving up, because you know the daily rate for those speaking events was was was crazy Once again you was earning ridiculous sums of money as a child.

Mark:

Well, I was still only 12, 13 was always sensible with it.

Henry:

My both of my parents never let me kind of go go mental. That was kind of that side of it. But then I, then I saw that I wanted to do musical theatre and I don't feel like I've lost anything from that. You know I I could have been doing hugely well now in that side of it If I'd kept going. I had a really good deal going with them, yeah, but but I've moved on. I haven't. You know that's parked now. I see that side of my life is as as put to one side, and you know I haven't locked the door on it But it's. But it isn't something that I feel I need to rush back to, because I love what I'm doing now more than anything.

Jack:

Yeah.

Henry:

And you know, during covid I was spent a lot of time, as people probably are right now, listening to podcasts.

Jack:

Yeah.

Henry:

And was listening to the America's on BBC and then started to write parodies for them and became a kind of resident songwriter for them with John Soap and Emily Maitlis, which was crazy.

Mark:

And then find that he's got this sort of Midas touch that whatever you choose to sort of jump into it just is successful. Well, because I can't believe the fact that you've got this incredible TikTok sort of hit.

Henry:

Well, they were then on TikTok, which then got 10 million views, which was crazy, yeah. But I think people with that sort of thing And I think it's easy to think when I tell the story, which is a very condensed version, i could go on about this for hours, which I have been now for an hour These opportunities seizing the moment is a big lesson that I just spoke about. The way I got Cameron McIntosh in the book was I managed to get to the Hamilton opening night And, by the way, purely through buying tickets to it, just managed to be on the site early to buy tickets to the opening night of Hamilton in London And I went because I knew some famous people would be there. I went with little folded up letters the size of a business card. So what is? miniature envelopes to hand them out in, because I knew that someone wouldn't want to carry around an A4 piece of paper.

Henry:

So I created these business card sized letters which had an invitation to be in the book in, and I gave them out to a few people the writer of Hamilton, lin-manuel Miranda. I literally sent someone who was going to the after party in with this letter And I said to them if you see Lin-Manuel Miranda, give him this. And I got a letter from Lin two weeks later. How?

Mark:

fantastic.

Henry:

But Cameron McIntosh was an interesting one because I didn't see him there. I really wanted him in the book. I was set on getting him in. I'd email his agent and emailing agents, as we know from trying to get Joanna Lumley on the podcast, it's never a good idea. I was desperate to find Cameron. I couldn't find him anywhere. As I was leaving I heard someone say well, you congratulate Cameron for me And a word that sounded like so. I thought it was his sister, it was his assistant, and I went over and I said to this lady, i don't suppose you know Cameron McIntosh. And she went yeah, i'm his assistant And I'm like this tiny little child and she's thinking who the hell are you?

Jack:

Yeah.

Henry:

I said can you give him this? She went yeah, and anyway I was expecting nothing from it. But he then emailed me saying yeah, let's, let's have an interview.

Mark:

I always think, though, you've got to have a bit of a talent, and I just think that somewhere along the line you can see clearly, and we've all seen you as a special child. You are.

Jack:

I might keep saying you are a special child. You are No, but nobody. No, you are.

Mark:

From beginning, from literally meeting you. there was always, and of course I talked to you on the Brewer's House Party through COVID.

Henry:

I mean there's a really good ask.

Mark:

How many children did I actually interviewed? No, I only interviewed you as a child.

Henry:

What I loved about that interview was a. we couldn't play any of my TikToks because they were very political, anti-trump, yeah. But also what I love about that Brewer's House Party is I've got and I've got it saved on my iPad. It's the first time the three of us had a first communication with us as a three which I find really touching now looking back at that.

Henry:

But no, post-covid was was weird, because I think I kind of had this shift in my mindset of what I wanted to do. I went to a local musical theatre college which was the worst experience of my entire life, just horrific.

Mark:

Don't you think that was because, once again, you were better, I mean my daughter's obviously was a local theatre college And they were asking her to sing these songs and the singer couldn't really explain it. A lot different when you go to the performing arts schools because obviously they were very much professional professionals. Yeah.

Henry:

Well, no, this one was. This one was quite a well, well, well regarded course And I let one person off in this, which is my singing teacher I'm just going to say that I let her off here and she is not included in the following statement Should be appreciated. Every single teacher at that college was just abysmal. Their lack of passion for the subject that they were teaching, lack of creativity and any vague understanding of logic was just laughable. I mean the whole. It was just the most soul destroying course I've ever had the misfortune of being on.

Jack:

That's such a shame because it has such a detrimental effect to people.

Henry:

Oh my God, I mean, but with you.

Jack:

You again, you've, you've learned these coping, coping mechanisms to rise above these sort of things. But like yeah other people who haven't built up those mechanisms, then that can be really damaging. I really can't.

Henry:

I have a strong relationship with musical theatre And I've got some friends called Kevin and Thomas who have just managed to heighten that even more and find even more of a passion for the music of Stephen Sondheim and other musicals and, you know, have allowed me to go to these amazing shows and stuff and I thank them for that hugely. But they, you know college almost made me lose my passion for musical theatre And you know, for that to be a thing is is, is huge. So I I left that course in a year And after that this is like February last year I was for the kind of second time in my life, in a actually pretty horrible place Just thinking what am I going to do? Kind of, I guess, doubting myself that I finished the public speaking stuff. Covid happened. I'd left college.

Henry:

My plan was initially to go on to a performing art school And I was kind of thinking I've really messed this up, haven't I? And I was in a really dark place just thinking, As many performers do this as well, I don't feel I'm talented enough to do this. I don't think I'm good enough to do this. I don't, you know, I just don't believe in myself. I was really struggling, I think my mum then messaged Mark to say that and say, can you come and do a week's work experience? And I did the week's work experience and it was amazing. I had a great time. At the end of that I then got offered a job on my final day, which was which, which was wonderful, And my first first meeting of Mike Scott in his office, which I'm sure now he may regret, You know, because we all do because the last one was in Mike's office. I did love an explosive. So you know that's only a year apart from from being offered a job, letting off an explosive in your managing director's office.

Jack:

What a journey. What?

Henry:

a journey we've been on, mike, but anyway, that kind of leads me to now to being the host of the number two podcast in Hopson on C.

Jack:

Wow.

Mark:

Well, there we are, and that only took an hour and a half, which includes part one of this two part episode that it'll now have to be, But anyway, sorry that's taken an hour and a half.

Jack:

No, to be honest, henry, i expected nothing less. Well, thank God that we've edited this episode down, so it's not an hour and a half.

Henry:

Yes, no, that was a. that was a tough edit job for me.

Jack:

Is it? was it weird listening to yourself ramble on for so long? Because that is exactly what we have to go through on a daily basis.

Henry:

I don't feel like I need to say long goodbye because it isn't goodbye, it's just, it's only till tomorrow. Yeah, good night.

Jack:

See you tomorrow.

Henry:

See you tomorrow for our next episode, the part two.

Jack:

Unless you're listening, obviously in a week or so, and then you just just just hit play on episode two now.

Henry:

Just hit play now and we'll just start it with Hello again.

Jack:

Yes, Yeah, should we? Should we finish a sentence? Should we finish this? It's a start. Another one, yeah, yeah.

Henry:

Well, jack, you wouldn't believe what happened to me last night, Do we?

Jack:

have to go into this. I mean, this is part one of a two part episode we haven't got. We've just heard enough of you talking in long monologues. We don't need to hear another one.

Henry:

Well, what happened is?

Henry Jack's Podcast Interview
Childhood Memories and Fear of Horses
Childhood Experiences and Entrepreneurship
From School to Success
Self-Published Book to Meeting Branson
From Public Speaking to Musical Theatre
Overcoming Challenges in Pursuing Musical Theatre
Continuing the Podcast Journey