The All Exclusive Podcast

S1 - E16 - Jack Jenkins - Part One - “I Went to Ghandi’s House”

July 16, 2023 Jack Jenkins and Henry Patterson Season 1 Episode 16
S1 - E16 - Jack Jenkins - Part One - “I Went to Ghandi’s House”
The All Exclusive Podcast
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The All Exclusive Podcast
S1 - E16 - Jack Jenkins - Part One - “I Went to Ghandi’s House”
Jul 16, 2023 Season 1 Episode 16
Jack Jenkins and Henry Patterson

Welcome aboard this riveting journey of laughter, misadventures, and nostalgic trips down memory lane. Prepare to be captivated as we share our hilarious wrongdoings around the resort, from the Atlas Theatre fire doors fiasco to the case of the wrongly called bingo numbers. Be part of our joy as we revel in surprise gifts from our listener Steph, who works at Five Lakes and flaunts an all-exclusive podcast tattoo! And for all bird watchers, join us as we clear up the infamous puffin story that turned out to be a mere magpie sighting.

Ever wondered about the influences that shaped us? Well, get ready for a deep dive into our childhood reminiscences and drama experiences. Feel the salty sea breeze as I, Jack, recount growing up near the coast, and journey with me through my advertising studies in London. We'll also let you in on our unique drama class experiences and discuss the power of opportunity in molding one's life.

Just when you thought it couldn't get any more exciting, we shift gears and take you along Jack's thrilling journey in the entertainment industry. From attending local shows to working at Potters with his childhood friend, Faye, and onto the high seas of cruise ship adventures, Jack's story is one for the books. Hear about his transition to TV presenting and career highlights that followed. As we wrap up, we look ahead to the looming holiday and the dilemma of choosing between Jack or Mark for a world cruise. So, buckle up for an episode filled with laughter, nostalgia, and thrilling tales!

Support the Show.

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Welcome aboard this riveting journey of laughter, misadventures, and nostalgic trips down memory lane. Prepare to be captivated as we share our hilarious wrongdoings around the resort, from the Atlas Theatre fire doors fiasco to the case of the wrongly called bingo numbers. Be part of our joy as we revel in surprise gifts from our listener Steph, who works at Five Lakes and flaunts an all-exclusive podcast tattoo! And for all bird watchers, join us as we clear up the infamous puffin story that turned out to be a mere magpie sighting.

Ever wondered about the influences that shaped us? Well, get ready for a deep dive into our childhood reminiscences and drama experiences. Feel the salty sea breeze as I, Jack, recount growing up near the coast, and journey with me through my advertising studies in London. We'll also let you in on our unique drama class experiences and discuss the power of opportunity in molding one's life.

Just when you thought it couldn't get any more exciting, we shift gears and take you along Jack's thrilling journey in the entertainment industry. From attending local shows to working at Potters with his childhood friend, Faye, and onto the high seas of cruise ship adventures, Jack's story is one for the books. Hear about his transition to TV presenting and career highlights that followed. As we wrap up, we look ahead to the looming holiday and the dilemma of choosing between Jack or Mark for a world cruise. So, buckle up for an episode filled with laughter, nostalgia, and thrilling tales!

Support the Show.

Speaker 1:

So there we go, henry. This is, this is my episode. Why?

Speaker 2:

we started it with, so there we go. That's very unlike us.

Speaker 1:

Well.

Speaker 2:

I just thought let's make it a little bit as we near the end of season one.

Speaker 1:

Yes, and I feel with season two some more shake-ups will happen. Hmm we may get rid of you. What do you mean, jack?

Speaker 2:

You're not getting rid of him to you.

Speaker 1:

I'm gonna replace you with Patty LaPuffin. I'm gonna she have to say about that. Ah See, there we go. Do you think Henry should stay, zach? Yes he doesn't sound sure, does he?

Speaker 2:

No, he does want me to stay. Zach would love me to stay. Zach, would you like him to stay?

Speaker 1:

Yes, see, there you go. He's saying yes, but his heart says no.

Speaker 2:

How was it doing an episode this this week? You're another two-parter, jack. I know it says another Sunday special.

Speaker 1:

Well, we just thought we'd do something a little bit different. I mean, we do know what it's nice sitting down and having Just an open conversation with with Mark and yourself. I'm not sure if we said it in the interview or when we went for lunch afterwards, but we know a lot about each other, but we don't really sit down and have those conversations so in-depth do me.

Speaker 2:

We said that over lunch, I think we did, didn't we? I thought it was I had a cheese and ham panini.

Speaker 1:

Yes, I had a chicken sandwich from the pier hotel Mark had a tuna sandwich not that anybody cares. And we all have a side of sure why you do this thing where you you'd like to give unnecessary bits of information.

Speaker 2:

I think you'll find people care. Shall I tell you something else? People care about, jack Are various wrongdoings around the resort. Yes, yes, because it's been a it's been a busy week this week.

Speaker 1:

It's been an inventful week, hasn't it?

Speaker 2:

Hmm, many things have happened and many things that we like to put into the part of the podcast that we call.

Speaker 1:

Things we got told off for this week.

Speaker 2:

This week, jack, I ran out of the Atlas Theatre fire doors and Broke the magnet on top of the door because I opened it so harshly that it had to very quickly be repaired. Soon after I ran out of it I was told off very much.

Speaker 1:

This week, henry, I Miss called not one but two numbers incorrectly in bingo and a few people got quite frustrated and I got told off very much. Something we both got told off for this week opening a bottle of champagne at Wimbledon.

Speaker 3:

We were told off very much.

Speaker 1:

This week, henry, I stole some of the new boo panda cuddly toys and I was told off very much.

Speaker 2:

This week, jack, I failed to read the rotor to notice that I was on two sets rather than one singing set, so used all of my material in one set, only to find that I had nothing left for my second set. I was told off very much, and that is things we got told off for this week.

Speaker 1:

We've seen the error of our ways.

Speaker 2:

Now, as we often discuss, which we absolutely adore when people send things into us, jack, not send them into us, but send them in addressed to us.

Speaker 1:

Yes.

Speaker 2:

Well, steph from Five Lakes.

Speaker 1:

I know you're gonna go with this.

Speaker 2:

Yes has not only sent us some things in now Steph.

Speaker 1:

Let me just clarify. Steph works in the kitchen at Five Lakes and I think she's hoping to do a bit of work on the activities team as well, she is but yes, she came on site on holiday at Hopton on C this week, didn't she?

Speaker 2:

yeah, and first she presented us with some glorious gifts from the poppin shop at Five Lakes, part of their puffin range as a puffin cushion which I'm using right now that from Steph, it is from stuff. Lovely, that's yeah, and she also gave us a puffin like a puffin windmill.

Speaker 1:

That's lovely. Yes, I've seen that a painy to assemble that ourselves, though, so we need to have a bit of an arts and crafts afternoon and put that together we do.

Speaker 2:

We can head over to zest. Yes, we, could you give us the towel?

Speaker 1:

I don't know. No, that was. Russell.

Speaker 2:

King gave us the towel and Russell King gave us a puffin towel.

Speaker 1:

No, I know, that's what I just said. Russell King gave us the towel.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, but Steph also yes, because I was doing bingo, so that she was.

Speaker 1:

She went a step further. So we just said yes. Steph, I was doing bingo sales. She came to buy some tickets and then proceeded to show me her puffin Tattoo.

Speaker 2:

She is the first person to get an all-exclusive podcast tattoo.

Speaker 1:

Yes, she is?

Speaker 2:

she has a puffin.

Speaker 1:

No, no, no, no, no. Then it's basically it's a, it's a metaphor for what has happened here with this puffin story. Because, just a sort of recap, if you, if you haven't heard the puffin story, henry said he was sat on the beach. He saw a puffin which I did later on, which I did we laid, we discovered that it was in fact a magpies. It was not no, because you saw a magpie, went, look there we go.

Speaker 2:

Jack, you tell the same story every week and people getting very bored of you. Now, no, no, no, jack. People getting bored of your hosting. They're not. Yes, they are.

Speaker 1:

Oh no, they're not Henry Jack, yes, they are, jack. No, you're just getting annoyed because I'm revealing the truth that you're a liar. You told a bit of a fib. Even mummy has talked to you about that now. But yes, it is. The tattoo is of a magpie Looking into a mirror and seeing a puffin in its reflection. It's a very good tattoo.

Speaker 2:

It's a very good tattoo, very good artist. Yeah, should we begin your episode? I think we should. Well, this is episode 16, part 1 Jack Jenkins on the all exclusive podcast. Press play no Jack Jack. You introduced mine, I'm gonna introduce yours you get a little bit angry there, I didn't you, henry, press play a little bit, I can press play you. Did they play the recorder at school I was.

Speaker 1:

I rocked out on hot cross buns. Yeah, hot cross buns, the only song that anybody ever knew what?

Speaker 2:

why did we all stop playing the recorder day?

Speaker 1:

Where does the recorder actually give you any benefits in life?

Speaker 3:

Do you not think? No, it's because none of us could play it properly, and it was just.

Speaker 2:

I. Got an a key thumb. Did you have the a key thumb thing, you know? Because you had to hold down on the Valve at the back?

Speaker 1:

You just maybe got weak hands.

Speaker 2:

No, it wasn't weak hands.

Speaker 1:

my recorder teacher, mrs Murray, was just relentless in how no, I think, but you build up a resistance over time. So I guitar players with building up calluses on their fingers. I think you maybe just didn't have the strength in your hands to play.

Speaker 2:

I've got a simple no.

Speaker 3:

No, it just sounds like you didn't have the strength in your hands to play a recorder, which goes to the fact that, jack, we don't know nothing about your childhood.

Speaker 2:

Yes, what a segue.

Speaker 1:

That was no and well because, I saw now we know I played the recorder once. Yeah, no, that's true.

Speaker 3:

Because, for everyone who doesn't know, jack is a local boy.

Speaker 1:

I am a local boy.

Speaker 3:

Henry is just from posh areas. Yeah, we are here. Yes, and Jack, you are a right.

Speaker 1:

Oh, yoko a right old you called, did you say yeah, give us a bit of sort of Norfolk twat Norfolk, I don't really I don't. I don't really have much of a Norfolk accent two words.

Speaker 2:

You do sometimes, yeah, well, apparently so.

Speaker 1:

I do say else.

Speaker 3:

What's that?

Speaker 2:

So I else with a T, nothing else I don't see that as a debilitating thing. And the way you say, not the way that you say, norwich is sometimes.

Speaker 1:

Norwich. Yeah but you can't help it sometimes.

Speaker 3:

Can you? Did you try and get away from the Norfolk sound? I?

Speaker 1:

don't really know. I was always told I brought up talking properly.

Speaker 3:

Yes, so actually you come from a quite because you say I was quite posh when I first.

Speaker 1:

Now I've just started talking. Like you, mark, I absorb people's Incinations. Well, my mom.

Speaker 2:

Well, my mom made this observation that Jack has become better spoken throughout this podcast.

Speaker 1:

I just mock you more, more but I did used to speak fairly properly about Having spent time with James and Mark and, and you end up I just, I'm really I'm a bit of a mimic. I pick up people's mannerisms quite easily and Just start talking like people, sometimes to take the mic, and then it just develops over time.

Speaker 2:

Ladies, gentlemen, the next mark Brewer I.

Speaker 3:

Don't know. I don't know ever come.

Speaker 1:

I have to. I have to say, sometimes I take the the mickey out of your Mispronouncing ours so often that I then, in everyday language, start mispronouncing my arse on a midweek break.

Speaker 2:

He does it more than you can realize you're doing it.

Speaker 3:

No, yeah, just.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but yeah, I'm from. I'm from Galston on C, which is now that was last week named the best beach in the UK.

Speaker 2:

How do you always? Lived in Galston.

Speaker 3:

Yes, because you you bring up the farm occasionally, that you live on farm in your mom.

Speaker 1:

Didn't grow up on the farm farm is a recent addition in the last sort of 10 years. Okay but I never really lived on.

Speaker 2:

I did when I came back from cruise ships, but I lived in London for a bit as well when I went to university that shocks me, because I see Jack as being a Seed-weller, not someone who lives on the sea, but someone who stays by the sea well but I can't imagine you as a city boy. Well, to be fair, my campus at university overlooked the Thames okay, so you still buy water, yeah, so I always had water in sight.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, even outside of my window I could see that, and what was you actually studying?

Speaker 3:

I mean, what was you there for? I wouldn't have been for comparing bowls.

Speaker 1:

Well, well and funny. You should say that, no, I studied advertising at university Because, I mean, I've always been interested in entertaining and wanted to be an actor or a comedian or an entertainer of some description. But it's one of those things. You I grew up always wanting to be that and wanted to be an actor and or something along those lines went to college and the theory based elements of of drama and theater at college just completely Ruined it for me and I just completely lost the love for it. And it goes back to some of what you said.

Speaker 3:

You were talking a regular theme and, to be honest, sky had the same experience, really the local one she went to so that she was studying in a levels.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that was one part of the a levels was drama. But again, you have to get high on the fact that everyone's got different ideas and their experiences and when a Drama teacher starts off and he has 10, 20 people in front of them, at least 90% of them haven't got a clue what that means. Yeah, they just thought, well, let's do drama. And then that's a get. Why so frustrated for Henry, who's got so much experience? And then even for you, jack, because I for those who might not know, I had watched you Cliff Park High School? Yes, because my children went to the. Yeah, and you just kept popping up in between the gaps.

Speaker 1:

That's my life. Yeah, so popping up?

Speaker 3:

No, we did, you did yeah, I think when Lexi was there he was a youngster.

Speaker 3:

Hmm, a few years younger than next year, but even then he was seen trying to be part of the show. I want to say show generations that you see in generations with schools and with Sport, football, whatever it is different generations. And when my daughter's Lexi was there, they had an incredible group of kids who were all into drama and some of them moved on to Billy Elliot. Greg went into the, into a show, not just a show, but he actually went into being filmed, being in the film of the. Was he X for X men? Yeah, one of the characters, yeah, and you thought, well, why not Naomi, so me is one of the top agents In in London.

Speaker 1:

What you're saying there is mark. All of those the kids in that year went on to do really, really well. And now I'm in hopton on C. Well, he was hosting the number two. Who's the winner here?

Speaker 3:

But I do believe it's sometimes it is from your childhood that, yeah, you have that wish to do something. 90% of the time, no one gets a chance to do yeah.

Speaker 1:

I think it's all about opportunities. Yeah, I mean talking about sort of the the poppy I had. I did have a lot of opportunities through school for different things, but I tell you what one of the one things that I did through school Drama wise. You've just sort of reminded me. In middle school we did, we did bugsy Malone and I was bugsy Malone.

Speaker 2:

Yes, do you still remember the opening monologue or something I?

Speaker 1:

start. I remember that it always start off with. Someone once said if it was raining brains, roxy Robinson wouldn't even get wet. And I always remember opening line because look what long monologue that one.

Speaker 2:

She turns a strange universal Parallel Jack. So I also did bugsy Malone.

Speaker 3:

Hmm, but not as bugsy.

Speaker 2:

No, no, I didn't want to go for bugs. I thought it was a bit of a redundant part of course which?

Speaker 1:

who are you?

Speaker 2:

then Henry, I Really I was not Tallulah, although she does have the best song in the show, yeah, so I would probably smash that and I bet you knew the song. Yeah, I bet you could have said to know that step away.

Speaker 3:

Let me do it.

Speaker 2:

I think what I Director really got the staging off for the bugsy Malone. It could have been a lot better, but I bet you told them that no, no, I didn't.

Speaker 3:

Every time he brought it up, he was going further back.

Speaker 2:

Yes yes, well, Henry, just go a little bit further back but no, I was one of the gang, but I was also the theatre, the casting director.

Speaker 1:

Yes, I know you and.

Speaker 2:

Really it was a good scene.

Speaker 1:

Did you steal the show there?

Speaker 2:

Not gonna say that, jack, but me and my scene partner, the pianist who was called Oliver there's now cabin crew for easy jet of all places Is now, what relevance was that to?

Speaker 3:

the story? I don't know.

Speaker 2:

Well, I just thought it would be interesting for people to know.

Speaker 1:

You mix with. You mix with those who are cabin crew for easy jet.

Speaker 2:

No, I was just telling you how his career progressed after bugsy Malone. Oh and I think you'll find he's senior cabin manager there you go. So anyway, no, it was a great scene. But bugsy Malone, I can see you playing bugsy Malone.

Speaker 3:

Did you do a good job at it.

Speaker 1:

That's what I want apparently so, but I think I was one of the. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

I know I had one of my worst reviews Reviews reviews I Doing a school, what play, yeah, and they ripped into me about it. I mean it was a what was the play?

Speaker 2:

Was it walling in green?

Speaker 3:

No, it was. It was a school, school play Bowen bolly group and I was the bow.

Speaker 1:

I'm not entirely sure if you a baron, oh baron, I just thought yeah, I just couldn't work out.

Speaker 3:

You said that Bowen bolly group yeah, I was the band bolly group and the critic gave it me a real bad.

Speaker 2:

Why I mean.

Speaker 1:

I would do it. We're involved, invited because I love I love, encouraging children.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I mean, I would never criticize. I never criticized you, jack, when you trying to be funny. Here we go in the Cliff Park for the talent in the show and you did it with a book, a mate.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's what.

Speaker 2:

I remember you started in a duo, didn't you Jacks?

Speaker 1:

Yes, so that and that's sort of like Okay, so I always, I always had a love for comedy, grew up watching, you know, the the more common wise and two Ronnies and things like that my grandparents introduced you much older, I mean younger than that me, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 3:

And why you would have had to catch up with yeah they weren't on at that time. No, no, but I think my big influence from from my grandparents.

Speaker 1:

I never really got into cannonball till later when I started looking at more, more comedy double acts, but but yeah, I don't know sort of Norman wisdom and things like that, I think just influenced from my grandparents to look at that and I for. And then Monty Python as well, actually, and my friend Aiden, we were very, very close friends. We started watching lots of Monty Python sketches and things like that and then through drama in high school and we we started to do more and more of their sort of comedy in sketches and over time we developed a bit of a comedy double acts which started through I don't know drama Bits and then talent shows at school. We start hosting different things and, yeah, one one, we we did host one of the talent shows, at least, or two of them, but one of them where sky was, sky was in. I do remember sky was involved. She sang, didn't she?

Speaker 3:

yeah, because then again he was older, the only sky was coming.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, but I I was always impressed. I just love people with confidence and I just love the fact that you didn't have, because most things with any with talent or any of us were watching anything, even in shows. If you see someone nervous, you get uncomfortable. Yeah, you know yeah and you can't help feeling up really uncomfortable if someone's like you can see that nervousness. Yeah, but I never, ever got that and that's what I was always impressed with, yeah thank you. I mean it wasn't funny, but no, well, thank you I mean stuff.

Speaker 2:

What are you doing? It was remember well.

Speaker 1:

We got some quite good reviews. I mean you make some people laugh.

Speaker 3:

It's not my brother, no, no, no, because you know me, I don't. Yeah, yeah, laugh at anything.

Speaker 1:

No, no, that's true it was. It was very much like you're standard Um, straight man, funny man sort of routines, comedy, double act, one being One I was a main sort of routine never actually went anywhere, but it was one person sort of trying to introduce something and the other person just messing up sort of thing, and it would also develop like that. But and that we got quite a lot of different things through that. As I said, we sort of, yes, we hosted like our school talent shows and things, but we also did things like we hosted the out there festival in great yarmouth.

Speaker 3:

We did like hosted a day on the stage there.

Speaker 1:

Lord mayors, stuff in Norwich and with all sorts of events all around Norfolk we ended up being a part of. But I think and that's something we really wanted to do more of, but we just didn't have the opportunities or the direction. We were like what?

Speaker 2:

1516, maybe even a bit younger- were you aware that that was what you wanted to do as a job, like where you were aware of the kind of comparing job sort of thing that you've got now? Or was that, like her, I'll be fun to this budget, to where I'd go to do it?

Speaker 1:

I again. I just I loved comedy. I fall in love with that and I wanted to do that Some for some reason. Yeah, yeah because it really wasn't even about coat, even hosting no he was always trying to do a funny routine in between your gaps of yeah it was more more about the comedy than it was about the hosting and we actually this is.

Speaker 1:

This is this will bring me on to my first experience of potters because, Because living locally it's always been that just is one of the holocaust down the road. This is a hidden gem really and I think if you're local, you if you've been here, you understand what it is and you understand what it's about. But if you haven't, you don't really know and understand what this place is and how good this place is. But potters hosted and sort of open talent audition day, and I do vividly remember me and we came in and we auditioned as our double act, we did our you know five minute routine or whatever, and and they said, well, we'll be in touch, and they never were. Who was on the panel? I believe it was, from what I remember it was Nikki Nigel, I think Rachel may have been there, but they turned you down. Well, they said they'd be in touch, but I think we would not what they were looking for to some extent.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'm not really sure and again, you gotta remember we were quite young, we were like 1415.

Speaker 3:

so right to you really wasn't gonna get a call back until you was gonna be 17. But of course, when do we take our youngsters for day and stuff? Well, we do work experience at 16.

Speaker 2:

Was that when you first?

Speaker 3:

started a potters in.

Speaker 1:

No, so no, I didn't. And then I didn't start at potters for many years after that. That was just my first sort of experience of it but we, had you seen anything of potters?

Speaker 3:

I mean, did you go and bother looking at a show?

Speaker 1:

Well, no, I just I wasn't able to. To be honest, I didn't know much about that or, had it had any opportunities to, because I would have done. Again, I always remember I would have always gone to see as many shows as possible, always went to the pavilion for the summer the circus whenever they had a new show on, because, again, I just loved that environment and was very, very keen to get involved in anything that I could, but just lacked the direction for that and we would always. We would always jump on sort of anything that's happened locally. We did one, we did a show at the pavilion Gorsdon Pavilion as well because there was a, but it was all sort of like local Show. I can't remember what it was called now, but I remember that was our first one where we did outside of school A picture there and that that went down really well. You could tell at the start people didn't really know what we were about or what it was, but as it went on.

Speaker 1:

you could feel that all that they understood the dynamic there and that I think that was the thing that really spurred us to keep going and doing extra pieces.

Speaker 3:

And when did you stop doing it with Aidan? I mean, when did you finally go? Let's give up on this.

Speaker 1:

Well, I think it just sort of fizzled out, because when is it?

Speaker 3:

simple. It was like it is with the ladies that you've met in your time and everybody knows you, as Jack has.

Speaker 2:

Did you confess that you loved Aidan and he turned you down?

Speaker 1:

No, unfortunately.

Speaker 2:

Unfortunately it wasn't as simple as that really, oh wow.

Speaker 3:

No, no, you grow up.

Speaker 1:

I think that was the thing after after college. We both sort of just sort of fell out of love of it and we again I said we lacked direction, we didn't really understand which route to take it. When we both ended up going to university, we both went different ways and that's. I think I had a good year or two outside of doing any sort of performing, when I went to, left college and went to university. But I was always looking for something to get involved in, but I just didn't find anything.

Speaker 1:

And that's, I think, when you're, when you are an entertainer and you really want to Passionately be involved in something, you've got this like an itch. It's the only way I can describe it like. And the whole time I was at university and the whole time I was at uni, the whole time I Wasn't doing anything to do with entertainment, wasn't on stage, I had this real itch and I would go and watch shows and I would just be like it's just, I want to be doing that and I don't know what it is I want to be doing, but I want to be doing that and that's that's how I knew when I was at university that, though I was enjoying what I was doing. I wanted to be doing something else and I was looking desperately to do Anything that I could be and just failing at it. At the time I wasn't really sure what I wanted to do after leaving college.

Speaker 1:

But I do remember sort of sending some emails to some of the local holiday Parks that I knew, like Vauxhall, for example, because I when I was, when I was at school, I did work experience at Vauxhall holiday park and and and enjoyed that, but I just didn't get any response back. You know, it's one of those things. I was just very unfortunate or probably in reality I was fortunate, because I'm one of those things that I wouldn't be here where I am now without the path that I kind of been down. But I just I just seem to be unlucky in that I just wasn't getting any response or any feedback or anything from any of these places, so I just didn't didn't have much luck there. And when did that change? I was at university again looking for as much as I could possibly do, and then I did get an opportunity to come work here at Potters.

Speaker 3:

When.

Speaker 1:

I was what I would say was the catalyst to everything changing really and that sounds really cliche and convenient really, but so, as we probably talked about, on, so I'm going to jump in.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I'm confused. Where did the cruising side come?

Speaker 1:

Well, it does come from this it does it does come from this.

Speaker 1:

So when I, when I first came to Potters, it was it was Faye who we spoke to Faye in earlier in the season and me and Faye have known each other since we were like four years old. We went to first school, middle, you know, high school, and all that together, college together. So we were quite good friends, same sort of friendship group. And she was working here. She's been working here for many years and I think there was a day in casual opportunity that opened up and she said are you be great to do this? So she passed on my details and I came in, came for a chat and then got off of the job. So I was when I first came here.

Speaker 3:

Is this through Claire bear? It was yeah.

Speaker 1:

So I was just on the day entertainment side of things. It was just sort of very casual. You know, a few hours, weekend, school holidays, mostly doing quizzes and your boy, bingo and all the simple sort of thing. But it was one of those things that I quickly just yeah, I'm pretty okay at this. Do you know what I mean? I can hold my own talking to you know, and you learn things gradually and you figure out. I can mess around with this or my. My style of humour is very dry, so when doing a quiz, that would naturally start coming out.

Speaker 3:

Your own persona wanted far more than doing a quiz or being part of a day that was doing everything, and I wanted to learn and I wanted to grow and I remember it reached a point where I did, I did ask if there was any more full time positions but was told to.

Speaker 1:

Unfortunately at that point in time there wasn't and that was, that was okay, that was understandable. You know, I was still at university anyway, but I can't really remember the ins and outs of it. But I had a friend, another friend, it's just. It gets this how I have just in my life I've just seen to fall in into things.

Speaker 3:

And it's just how these things happen. Life works out though Sure A lot of you know. I say fate yeah, no, and I do sort of agree with that sort of sentiment to some extent.

Speaker 1:

But I had another friend who used to work for cruise ships and she sort of said oh, they're looking for someone, again they're looking for someone and you'd be perfect for this. So I just went, I went down to Ipswich and spoke to the head office of Fred Olson and actually I had two interviews for two different cruise lines, one for Princess cruise lines, so I think I went down to Southampton to to an interview for that and then one for Fred Olson, and I was offered both jobs pretty much at the same time, pretty much there, and then so Fred, Olson one I was offered.

Speaker 1:

I didn't, I bet. Even got home and they offered me the job and said can you start next week? And Princess cruise, I had to weigh them both up. Basically yeah, but the Fred Olson seemed more my sort of style and was that Princess? I mean Fred Olson was a bit more money, which obviously helped, but also Princess cruise lines was a little bit more. It was just corporatey and a little bit and the rotors were six months away, two months at home, but you don't get paid for those two months and that was a big contributing, whereas Fred Olson was a bit more. The itineraries were varied. I had a nicer vibe from it, a nicer feel. It was four months on the ship and one month at home and you got paid in your month off and all of those. There was just so many things leaning more that way.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

And when they offered me the job, I just I didn't really. I said look, I can't. Fred Olson said oh, can you start in a week or two? And I was like, well, no, but give me a month to sort my life out a little bit. And you know, I took a year out of university. I said I'll be back in a year and then sort my life out. And then, yeah, went off and did the cruise ships throughout your time cruising.

Speaker 2:

Where was your kind of highlight destination? What was some of your fondest as people?

Speaker 1:

always ask you that sort of thing.

Speaker 2:

And I so it's so difficult. I think I know one of your answers because it's one that you bring up the most to me and does seem like the best day, which was New Orleans.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, that one, that one for me, yeah, I mean, when you're traveling the world, everywhere is amazing.

Speaker 1:

It's really difficult to pick one sort of place, because you've just come back from Norway and Iceland, which I've been there and that was fantastic. We did a lot of time around Norway and cruising is the best way to see that sort of place, because you're going up the fjords, you're seeing all these beautiful scenery and I love that, because I love hiking and exploring and seeing. But I also love other things, like the Caribbean and sitting on a beach and enjoying a few cocktails. But New Orleans was one of these experiences. We've done the Caribbean on a previous cruise, which was a month long cruise around the Caribbean, but that I think the Caribbean cruise must have been the start of the story. The New Orleans cruise was the start of my second contract, so I'd already done four months. I've been home, I'd seen my friends, I'd come back and I was ready to get back into it and New Orleans.

Speaker 1:

I flew into Barbados, we went around the Caribbean and we had just an amazing time as a. You know you've got this group of people that you're really. You know you've got this big group of friends that you, you love, totally bonded, and we arrived in New Orleans in a later night. We, we, we did the immigration, we got the guests off the ship and we've got, we all went through immigration and then we went out in the height of Mardi Gras. The very end of Mardi Gras was the last few days and I just remember it just being the best three days because we went out.

Speaker 1:

The first night we went to this dueling pianos bar and it was just this group of us myself, the theater company members, the other sort of members of the staff and you know, you having a few drinks, we, you pay. Basically you write a song down on a napkin, you put a dollar on the piano and they have to play that song. If they cannot play that song at hands, over to the other pianist in the room and it was just the best that we all having a big old sing along. And it was just one of the nights I will always remember for being such a great laugh. And any time you do an overnight as a on a cruise ship, any time you stay somewhere overnight, all of the crew just sort of migrate off of the ship into the nearest bars and have just this.

Speaker 1:

It's just this real sense of camaraderie with these people and Mardi Gras in general was just this amazing experience, because New Orleans is is so beautiful, is, but it's, it was just so busy. It was like the parades going on. Well you, but you got caught up in a parade, yeah so the next day my sort of rotor on the cruise ships as a host. We ever had the morning off, the afternoon off for the day off so you could explore these places.

Speaker 1:

The. I had the morning off and it was our first day in New Orleans. We just been out the night before and I had to go back for the afternoon. But I'm going to go straight into the city. I'm going to experience the parade. Let me get it.

Speaker 1:

We went off as a bit of a group. We went and watch one of the parades and I thought, wow, that's you know it was it was. It was amazing. They're all throwing beads off the off the side of the parades and things like that. And I think, okay, it's getting back to the time. I need to get back to the ship now. I've got I don't know carpet bowls or golf playing to do or something really exciting. So I started walking back to the ship because I thought we got a shuttle bus in. But I thought now I remember the route, I can walk back. And as I was walking back, I was like I think I'm a little bit lost here. I sort of knew the direction I needed to go, but I'd taken a wrong turn and as I sort of looked down this road, there was just this wall of people heading towards me and I don't know if I've shown you, maybe, a video.

Speaker 1:

You have shown me a video and it's amazing, it's just this sea of people sort of coming towards me, and I know I've got X amount of time to get back to the ship. But as these people were coming towards me, I was like do you know what? I'm just gonna join in on this. So I sort of turn around and I just sort of start, you know, just vibing within the parade for a good 10, 15 minutes and I went no, actually I do have to get back to work now.

Speaker 3:

And then You're on the right path.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and then in the end I did make it back to the ship and, yeah, like I said, we just had three days exploring this city. That was bustling and everybody seemed to have descended on.

Speaker 2:

And then after you made it back to the ship. How long was it before you made it back here?

Speaker 1:

So back to Potters. So, yeah, it was a good. I spent two years on cruise ships. In total, it was two years of Fred Olson and, again, like I said earlier, it was the real starting point for my time in why I am very much who I am today because of all of that. Yes, you've got all of these amazing places that you can travel to and there's stories for everywhere really. But I had this amazing cruise director when I first got on, called Jen Dolby. Big shout out to Jen, because I think we were talking last in your episode about these people who Influenced, who influenced?

Speaker 1:

You see something in you, without a doubt, and I think that you need those people in your life to sort of spur you on. So what's up, I never did things by the book because I'm just like that, I get itchy or I just I wanna find ways of making people laugh and I wanna make things entertaining. So actually I used to get told off. Well, big surprise there. But I always remember what, a little while into my first contract, I was doing some of these games like the carpet bowls, but it was the these golf batting. We had this board with like holes cut out and then they'd put the ball into the thing and we used to give out things like prize points and I would always just try and find ways of making it more interesting and make people laugh. So I would start creating my own sub games within the games, because you again, this is. I used to learn a lot from this moment because you'd get the same like 30 odd people every day and you'd write down their names and that's how I started like trying to remember people's names, which again is so, so important, so valuable. So I'd know that we'd have Keith and we'd have Ron and all that sort of stuff and I'd try and make things around that. But we used to do this thing with the golf playing.

Speaker 1:

If anyone scored zero, I started this thing called Jack's Quack. So the people who were the worst at the game I used to take the mick out a little bit and I'd put their name down on a separate bit and I'd go at the end of everything. We're not doing the highest scoring, these are the people who were the worst at this game. So I started doing Jack's Quack, which was like all those who'd scored zero would come back at the end to get a trophy that I'd made and they would keep the trophy for 24 hours for Jack's Quack. They called Jack's Quack because this trophy had ducks on it. It was a bit random, but I started doing things like that. We had like Wii bowling and again I would get the person who was Jack's best bowler and I used to hand out like a plastic bowling ball that I just found in a cupboard. But these games, like these subset of games, people used to enjoy them so much. They actually started enjoying them more than the actual games.

Speaker 2:

Well, it's always the best type, isn't it? You know, like when we did the afternoon races a few weeks ago and the system went down, that usually does them, so it's kind of improvised doing that, but it was like the most fun I've ever had doing races.

Speaker 1:

It's when you take something you do every day and then you start making it. Just find a ways of making it fun, and you had your big experience with Mexican tequila.

Speaker 2:

Yes, tequila bingo. Yeah, again that was incredible reaction. I got from that when I walked in to say Well, that was a good reaction, but that just came from again, just shaking it up a bit. I think I just found a sombrero backstage, you know, wine shirt.

Speaker 3:

And this is it you. It's that improv situation.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, you look at all of the ingredients that you've got in front of you or just a random piece of something that's lying around and you go how can I use that to make this more fun? And I very much. I mean again, I could talk about the cruise ship days for a long time because there's, like I said, there's, so many stories. There's so much that I learned about dealing with working under pressure or working in chaotic environments, which I kind of think I thrive on a little bit working under pressure.

Speaker 1:

Like when things go wrong. That's actually when I come into my element, because I just can deal with that and ignore all of the emotional side of things to some extent or deal with it appropriately, because we had moments where, you know, we had One of my last cruises I was very fortunate enough to do a world cruise as well which was 108 days all around the world, and that again, not everybody is on for the full 108 days, guest wise, but Some are they, some are, and you get to know these sort of people. But there's this one story where there was the fire signal went off. Basically, I always remember we had a cinema in there. I was sitting evening off or whatever in the cinema and we had the code for a fire. What film were you watching? I think it was the Justice League, can't really remember.

Speaker 1:

I think it was something along those lines and I just instantly got out and I saw some of the other staff members sort of milling around in the corridor and I was like, well, no, you need to go and do what you're supposed to be doing. But the way I deal with that is I just went to the entertainment lounge because you didn't have to go to your evacuation points but they were just letting you know that this area was going to be cordoned off and all of that sort of stuff and that's quite a high pressure situation. But I just dealt with that by going up and chatting to the guests and sort of coming them down and wandering around and doing what needed to be done sort of thing. And that was one of the weirdest points because we were the furthest away from land I think you could possibly get. We were in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

Speaker 1:

We just left Easter Island and we were heading somewhere, and that was just one of those weird moments in your life that you just but you couldn't manage to stay quite calm and cool and collective. Turns out there wasn't a fire, it was just some smoke from a, I think, a dishwasher or something kicking out smoke, and it caused this, all this sort of thing.

Speaker 3:

I did want to ask you a cruise question.

Speaker 3:

And it only occurred to me that you probably got a lot more experience of how understanding what goes on. But when we was in Recovich, we came back and we all had to be back on the ship the next day by 11 o'clock and then we had an announcement that there's a slight delay. We'll wait for four. Four guests and then off the ship went. About half an hour later the ship started moving. So what happens on that situation? Because I went, well, what do they do now? Because they probably didn't even have money. They might have had a car, but sometimes you don't even Carrie. What would those four people who was left behind now have to do? And you might have had that experience.

Speaker 1:

I can't say I remember anything specifically about people getting left behind the only time. I mean we've been delayed departure quite a few times, but that was more. I mean they definitely delay it if we've had tours that come back late.

Speaker 1:

And that's like 30 odd people, so they're not gonna leave. But a cruise ship will get fined longer it stays in port and it shouldn't, so they've got to leave. I don't know. I've kind of always wondered that myself and I feel like it's something I maybe used to know. Because the passport thing I always wondered for staff it was slightly differently because we gave our passports in, so the ship had our passports, so if we got stranded anywhere they would have left our passports at the cruise terminal.

Speaker 1:

But I don't actually know, because I was thinking that when I went on my cruise in March I was like if I was to get stranded here, my passport would just be in the safe. So I'm not entirely sure the ins and outs of that.

Speaker 3:

I mean, I just looked at disbelief because they only must have given them half of their extra. It would be an embassy job, I believe.

Speaker 2:

Yeah probably would have been yeah, it would be an embassy job.

Speaker 1:

It would have to be. It would have to be that sort of thing.

Speaker 2:

They'd be the only people that could sort it out.

Speaker 1:

I'll tell you one sort of story. It was the most frustrating day I think I'd ever had. So it was on the world cruise and I was doing. If you're a staff member you can take part in some of the tours but you host the tours basically. So you count people on the bus and off the bus and I did so many amazing tours through this. I went to Petra in Jordan and got to. That was one of my favorite tours I've ever done, just exploring this lost city famous for the bit in Indiana Jones and all of that sort of stuff. And I did so many. I did sort of swimming at the Great Barrier Reef and all of these fantastic things that you would never really normally get a chance to do, sort of seeing Komodo dragons on Komodo Island. But the most hellish one for me right, was we were in Mumbai and yeah, and India is just a hectic place and I can't really remember the ins and outs of why I've almost repressed memory.

Speaker 1:

But I was on a tour which we were going around India, mumbai, and going to like markets and just seeing different things like a museum and all of this sort of stuff. So my job was to count these people on and off the bus and it was just difficult to keep track. These particular guests were very, very awkward for some reason, and it was hot, it was warm. We went to the gates of Mumbai.

Speaker 3:

Humid, I'm guessing as well, yeah humid and it was just.

Speaker 1:

There was people everywhere and we stopped off and we went to the famous what is it called? Is the gates of Mumbai. The gateway to India is called. It's the big, it's like this thing on the docks gateway to India. We went and explored that.

Speaker 1:

Then, I think, we went to a couple of other places, these gardens, we went to the markets and had a little look around and then, basically, long story short, some people we'd gotten lost. The timing of the tour had been. We'd got delayed that's the word I was looking for. We got delayed, right. So we were behind schedule. So by the time we actually got to this museum, some people wanted to carry on going around these market stalls, some people wanted to go to the museum and some people wanted to go back to the ship, right. So we sort of made it clear, like, if you want to go around these markets, then just let me know first and I'll make a note of it and you can carry on, but you have to make your own way back to the ship, right. So then all of these people were being just deliberately a bit awkward. In the end some people left and didn't tell me that they were going to look around these markets.

Speaker 1:

We were at this museum, we went around the museum. We all had to be back on this coach at a certain time. We actually went to Gandhi's house as well, which was quite a wonderful sort of tour part of the tour but Was he in? No, he wasn't. Sadly, his flip-flop mounted on the wall though. But yeah, these guests decided so. Some guests just went without telling me. We'd all got back on the coach and I'd counted down and I was still missing two guests, and we waited there for half an hour or so and I was just like, well, they must have just gone back to this thing.

Speaker 3:

They're not told me, you have to make that bolt to the ship you have to make that call.

Speaker 1:

I went back into the museum. I went round and round, I was looking for these people. Couldn't find them at all. So it made the decision let's just go back to the ship. In the end, I ended up leaving two guests in the middle of Mumbai and I ended up seeing them back on the ship a little bit later on and they were like why did you just? And I was like, well, we had to be back at a certain time, turns out.

Speaker 3:

Where were they?

Speaker 1:

They'd gone to the wrong place to get the coach and they were rate-waiting in the wrong place and then they thought we'd just left them. But that was one of the most stressful days I think I'd ever had, because I'd just left these two people in the middle of the month.

Speaker 2:

I imagine that you didn't enjoy that very much.

Speaker 1:

Did not enjoy that, I was just. I was a bit traumatised after that. I was yeah ["The POTUS"].

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and again, it's you know, when you talk about just keep falling into things. I'd reached this point on the cruise ships where I'd been promoted quite a bit and I could see myself moving up to cruise director. I could see myself doing that, I could see. But I got to this point where again I was like, if I get to that position, I'm not gonna do as much of the comedy side of things that I wanna do, I'm not gonna do so much of the performing. It's you know you'll and yes, I'll be doing this travelling, but how much of it? Without being too arrogant.

Speaker 1:

I felt like I'd become a big fish in a small pond just in terms of what I was doing and I really wanted to learn and grow and do some more. So I was looking at coming off the ships to do more, maybe TV presenting or do more comedy entertainment. And I was still in contact with Rachel at the time and she was such a huge help to me when I first came back, because it was at that point that James R Hearn had just left one of the times he'd just left and she said look, there is an opportunity for you to come back here if you want to come and join the team and you would be doing more stuff in the evenings and be part more of the comedy team. Things worked out slightly different to that, but I was, I did, I took it, I ran with it, basically. So I made that leap to then step away from this life that I'd just built up on the cruise ships and come back to Potters. And again, it was just the right place, right time.

Speaker 1:

I was ready to leave that and to come and start something new. And I'm back here now and even this has not been. This has been a journey to get from starting back at Potters five years ago to becoming one of the hosts of the number two podcast in Hopton on C and I've got Mark to thank for a lot of that. To be fair, I mean Jen Dobby on my cruise director was a big part of me falling in love with that again and seeing something and building up my confidence. But again, I think you have certain people who see something in you and you've got. When I first came back again I wasn't really doing a lot with yourself, mark.

Speaker 3:

I think remember again.

Speaker 1:

This is not a lot at all, but Darren Gregory, who we worked with. He kept saying really positive things and I think he even said to John Potter just just watch him do they walk in past at one point to watch him do this quiz? Like he's clearly got something there. He's got, you know, and that was what he was telling John, which was which was quite fortunate for me.

Speaker 1:

Really, in the in the long term and over the first sort of year and a half that I was here, you know, I sort of again, I was sort of mostly doing daytime stuff and working the mid weeks. I started doing more in the evenings because Richard Bear, who was working with us at the time, I think he was off with an injury, he, so they allowed me to start doing more comparing to cover Richard while he was off. So I started comparing the shows. We didn't really do any comedy warmups at that point, but there was maybe like a few minutes here and there and I started doing more of that. And again, you find your feet, you find your voice, you find ways of doing that and then, sort of over time, slowly going into the, the shows, just sort of quite, you know, slowly to begin with. And again, I've never done anything like that before, never done any sort of singing dancing If you can call what we do that Ballet Jack of course.

Speaker 1:

But I slowly just started. That's. What I came here to do was to learn as much as possible, and I feel like I was slowly building up these blocks to to sort of help myself.

Speaker 2:

And now you've learned how to get great deals at Fortland and Mason.

Speaker 1:

Some some of the things I've learned has been useful. Some of them hasn't.

Speaker 3:

My biggest memories of that went of when COVID happened and then they said to me these are the people that you've got to work with and you've got to have a very busy period because you've got to cover everything from daytime to nighttime. That was, and we was there to sort of yeah, and that was such an integral part of why I'm here now.

Speaker 1:

But the biggest thing I think that was the second biggest thing, but the biggest thing before that, I think, because I've been building up all of this stuff, learning as much as possible. But the world.

Speaker 1:

The world bowls, I think, has been the biggest turning point for me, because up until that point I was, I was just. I was a part of things, but in a very small manner in terms of the Panto in 2019 and fewer bits in the comedy shows, but I still wasn't really a part of the team too much. I still wasn't really, I wasn't really given those sort of opportunities and I was still learning. So I do understand that, but I had. I had such a great support in the likes of Chris Dormer, who used to work here as well as our sort of comedy team manager at the time, and when, in 2019, world Bowls I covered Richard for one or two of the days while he was off, and the world bowls organizers Richard Madison at the time, said, oh, I'd like to see more of him next year, which was which was really lovely to have that sort of thing. So the year 2020 comes along Again, I'd just been doing little bits with yourselves and the comedy team and different things.

Speaker 1:

Richard Bear was no longer hosting the world bowls. He'd left the team by then and they had put forward three of us to take over the, the position of, of compare, of the world bowls and at that point I think I was a bit of an underdog really. You know our management put forward their sort of candidate, as you will. A couple you know had been put forward, but World Bowls had asked me to. They wanted to see more from me what they'd seen last year, and Sue Seker has also gave me a lot of support through that and pushed me quite a lot during that sort of time and that was really a big opportunity for me to go. Look, I need to up my game here. I need to just prove that this is what I'm capable of Like. I think for me it's always been a a confidence thing. I've always felt like I'm capable of more. It's just been the confidence, and you only get confidence by doing things right.

Speaker 3:

A lot of people don't really understand what that entails by the way, I mean, unless you go, you're actually a guest who are watching, you know, actually in the world, because, although you do, you see little bits on TV when you're hosting. Well, they don't realise that you've got 10, 15, 20, sometimes 20 minutes before to talk to the audience and then you really are revving them up a little bit.

Speaker 2:

It was almost like an entire pre-show at the beginning to some extent.

Speaker 1:

Just four five times a day.

Speaker 3:

And again you've got to remember it wasn't for one match you've got to do it for every match you've got to be seen and you've got to have things up your sleeves and you're dealing with it, and that is again another incredible expense that a lot of people not many people wouldn't even understand.

Speaker 1:

I think that's it was that that really worked in my favour, because I was given these 15-minute slots several times a day for the in the early period. Like I said, it was me sort of almost, you know, competing for this position against other people and, as I said, I was sort of the underdog here. But I went out there and I did. I was allowed to do my own thing. I wasn't restricted by what other people wanted me to do or other people's scripts or other people's material. I was allowed to go out there and do my own thing and I, and also you, had the TV element which I actually felt quite comfortable doing. I don't really know why, but it was that 15-minute warm-up. I went this is what I've got to prove myself with and in the end of all of that, they, they, the World Bowls Tour decided to choose me to move forward with with that, you know as the compare for the from the BBC and all of that.

Speaker 1:

And that was that, for me, was probably one of my internally proudest moments, because I had I put a lot of effort in just proving that I was capable of doing that.

Speaker 3:

Initially, when the World Bowls happened, we was all part of it, but we caused chaos like I would do. I had this sort of you know flooded the rink. I would tease the Scottish and tease the work, because at the time the Scottish were always probably the best team and there's a big contingency of the Scottish it's got to come in and obviously there was the level of the Welsh and and I found that really great that I could really wind up the English, the Welsh and all the people who were playing.

Speaker 1:

One of my favourite stories that you've told me about when you used to be involved in the World Bowls is when you had the remote control bowl. Yeah oh my God.

Speaker 3:

We we again. Mark Hedges said to me Mark, I've. He said Mark, look at this, we've got this remote control ball. I said sorry, what do you mean? How does that work? And he says well, it's just the jack that inside the weight, that moves the jack left or right.

Speaker 1:

The wood. You mean the wood in the wood.

Speaker 3:

But in the wood they have a little bit of a weight.

Speaker 3:

That takes it left up the bias, which is your right saying so. He just explained to me. I mean, I wasn't that, I just knew that actually we could control where that bowl went. So we, we literally took on. We said we're going to take on near enough, the World Pairs champions before the singles, because that already has been taken place and we're going to challenge you. And we gave them the balls and we said look, we know what you like. You've got to be able to be good enough to play with any bowl. I don't play bowls and you know.

Speaker 3:

So, literally, we was taking this on with the fact that you've got to use these bowls. We'll use these bowls and just see how good you are when it comes to it. But what they didn't know that we'd waited the other bowl. So the one bowl was going to, although it marks, because there's markings on the bowl to tell you that it's going to go inside or left, right, whatever and we swapped them all over. So every bowl they made was disastrous, every bowl that they watched. And we was just rolling our own bowl and it didn't matter how close we got, they just couldn't get close to it. So eventually they started this is yeah, they, they saw someone's wrong but they didn't know that the very last bowl was a remote control. So literally we had this ball coming down going and they could. If you ever seen a swerving bowl that they just couldn't believe that we was actually having mark edges control it for us to go down.

Speaker 2:

That is very funny.

Speaker 1:

I think that's just brilliant.

Speaker 2:

I think that's really brilliant.

Speaker 1:

So I said sort of the bowls in 2020 was one of the big turning points for for my career here. Really I think because, not only did that solidify that I was capable of a lot of this stuff that I kind of maybe doubted myself on before, but also when it did come down to, you know, a few months later, we obviously were locked down just directly afterwards and we didn't know what was going on as months went by. Who knew what was going to happen?

Speaker 1:

really we knew what the future was. But we were. We, as you said earlier, mark, you touched on it. We were invited back and you know various entertainment team members were were invited back. But I actually got a phone call directly from Mike Scott saying that John Potter had asked for me to to come back and be a part of the team. They wanted me to come and and it really was a small team.

Speaker 2:

Well, there were some fry ups that needed eating on a guest street.

Speaker 1:

So but I really hold the bowls the like he'd seen what I in person, what I'd done at the bowls. And I think I in my head contribute a lot of that to that. And what a, what a summer.

Speaker 3:

That was really because I think I think pot has gotten another innovation award for a period of time, because it was quite remarkable, john Potter and Mike and literally changed every, every, every rule that the government threw out. They adapted to, and it was the South Terrace. We got told we're going to have an outdoor because we can't come inside and there's only a handful of teen, there's only like two boy vocalists, three girl vocalists. There was no dancing. Literally, we was in this very small nuclear that had to cover everything from. Everything had to be outside, and we were blessed that we had a fantastic summer. We did that, we were able to do that, and then, of course, we had the streaming of of it was ridiculous.

Speaker 1:

Inside, when we first came back, you weren't allowed to do live entertainment indoors. Yeah, and we didn't know at the time when we came back that you could do entertainment outside. Apparently that was up in the air. So we built the South Terrace, but we'd also we'd put all these new TVs around the resort we built. We took 50 hotel suites away and made them into dining suites. So if you knew when your bubble could come and eat in those dining suites which you became very well acquainted with, visited a few.

Speaker 3:

But we were only visiting on the outside.

Speaker 1:

Yes, we were we were only in the outside balcony, on the balcony, to join them on the grand level.

Speaker 3:

It was a unique situation. And most guests absolutely loved the whole life.

Speaker 1:

How weird was it for me and you who were comparing and doing we were doing a warm-up to an empty room.

Speaker 2:

That's crazy.

Speaker 1:

To an empty room and we were filming it and streaming it into people's rooms.

Speaker 3:

But I do think it was totally love changing on that point of view of the the Jack Jenkins came that everybody knew and became part of the whole magic that we have and you understand again. And of course it is the fact that I relax when I know you're on stage, I know that you're going to chat away.

Speaker 1:

It gave us an opportunity to figure out our dynamic. And I think we learned that we could rely on each other. Like we've got this weird way of knowing what the other person's sort of thinking If you start talking about something I kind of know which direction you're taking that and vice versa. I think I've found over the years.

Speaker 2:

It's funny. I've kind of noticed we have this way of manipulating the word I would use, although it sounds quite aggressive, but manipulating a conversation to set up a story. To set up a story, if that makes sense. You know, we can almost tell from the first sentence of each other saying something oh, I'm going to tell this story and Mark's going to say this, and then Jack will come back with that, and then I'll say this and then it will kind of do that.

Speaker 1:

But, I have to sort of almost thank you in that level of trust, Mark, that you've given me, Because that is a little bit of you, because there are moments where I've just gone off on a and you've not you've allowed me to do that which if that's important to me. Well, yeah, of course, it's quite a because.

Speaker 3:

And again that's what's developed, with Henry coming on board as well because he gives us a unique, again another dynamic. Yeah, totally, and we try and do that with everyone that comes on board. Don't get think that we do it just between us. It's just that eventually people get come on board with us on different.

Speaker 1:

All of our style of humor is all very personality driven. And it's it's conversational. It's not necessarily all sketch bases, mostly conversational.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and that's why I think it's. You've got to have that underlying dynamic for it to work, Otherwise it can be really interesting after hearing Henry story and hearing your story how weirdly we have got so so many things that came to pass and that happens between us. We all got told off because we had different ideas of how we saw it as a young youngsters, yeah, and the fact that we all had yes and we all had our own positive way of wanting to do something, and then, you suddenly see how you know generations of years go by.

Speaker 3:

How suddenly we've got a 19 year old with me, which is 45, nearly 50 years away from me, and Jack who's like 40 years away from me. How we've all got so many things we have in common.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I've got to say it and it sounds sentimental, but I do love you two very much.

Speaker 3:

Oh God, oh wow.

Speaker 1:

Contrary to popular belief, yeah.

Speaker 3:

Because we become a part of your will with mommy and daddy, we can write us in today. Yeah, okay.

Speaker 1:

Do you know? This is quite a funny. You sort of touch on that is quite a funny. I was talking to Twitch, who's one of our new entertainers, who's just joined us this week, and we were having this bit of a conversation. He sort of said that that is a thing with. I don't necessarily class myself as a comedian because I feel like that creates a lot of connotations or people presume one thing or another, right.

Speaker 1:

But, he said that is a thing with a lot of comedians. They just see the world in such a different way. There's another level of you know what I mean. It's this cognitive like another dimension, vision, to some sense of like, you just see things differently, and I think that is again like you said. That's something we all do, the three of us. We see something in such a different way, and that's sometimes why we get in trouble for things, because we see things in a different way to how other people do.

Speaker 1:

And I think actually thinking back to my school days. That is why I would be told off quite a lot and get detention, because I would see something in different way and I'd question things or I would argue things because I see it in a completely different way to how it.

Speaker 3:

But I was never really aggressor, meaning, in fact, that I wouldn't ever question teachers or that I just Okay, just us, yeah, no. But I was still always being pulled up for doing things that I shouldn't been doing at school, and I used to stand up in assembly and do parodies on the teachers, but do you know the reason.

Speaker 3:

Again, no one asked me to I would stand up and say I've got something to say and then I'd go in attacking of probably why I got the fact that I got told off for cheating in the cross country instead of you know that's you seeing something in a different way, yeah, to other people and you just, you're just bringing that to. I'm not saying that I think yeah it's quite interesting, but it's been very interesting hearing everyone's stories. I just find that fascinating.

Speaker 1:

But yeah, no, that sort of brings us, I suppose, us all working together now because in such a creative way and I is a nice dynamic that we've got at the moment, do you know what I mean? Or across the board, and all the, all the people we've got in our entertainment team, we've just got such a lovely dynamic going on with those, you think.

Speaker 2:

And maybe we can all go and get lunch later.

Speaker 3:

No, what a lovely thought.

Speaker 2:

Well, Jack, there we go.

Speaker 1:

There we go. There was my episode.

Speaker 2:

How was that?

Speaker 1:

Incredibly strange.

Speaker 2:

I don't like listening to myself. We both said the same thing.

Speaker 1:

I don't like listening to myself back, so I probably will never listen to that ever again. But it is interesting talking about some of those things and remembering things I do. I do enjoy reminiscing, don't do it enough, reminiscing. As Mark would say, reminiscing. Yes, tomorrow we are designing my perfect part of your perfect part of break.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and you're going to be choosing who you're going to take on holiday me or Mark.

Speaker 1:

I think we all know the art or the options going to be there.

Speaker 2:

I'm flattered.

Speaker 1:

Okay, that's important to you and Mark grills me quite a lot tomorrow about my previous relationships about all your girlfriends. Yeah, it's he was.

Speaker 2:

he had a lot of notes on that he had a lot of notes because I could look over and I'd saw his kind of sharpie notes. Yeah they were everywhere All girlfriend one, girlfriend two, girlfriend three, girlfriend four. Would you like to say goodbye to these nice people?

Speaker 1:

Bye, nice people. Bye nice people. Where would you like to visit on a world cruise, henry?

Speaker 2:

I probably want to go to like Switzerland.

Shake-Ups and Told Offs
Childhood Drama Experiences and Comedy Interest
Journey to Finding Passion in Entertainment
Cruise Ship Adventures and Fun Games
Cruise Ship Experience and Mishaps
Cruise Ships to TV Presenting Transition
Remote Control Bowling and Career Highlights
Episode Reflections and Future Plans