The All Exclusive Podcast

S2 - E7 - Roulard - (feat. Rachel Baade)

November 06, 2023 Jack Jenkins and Henry Patterson Season 2 Episode 7
S2 - E7 - Roulard - (feat. Rachel Baade)
The All Exclusive Podcast
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The All Exclusive Podcast
S2 - E7 - Roulard - (feat. Rachel Baade)
Nov 06, 2023 Season 2 Episode 7
Jack Jenkins and Henry Patterson

What if an apology could set the stage for an unforgettable episode? Brace yourself as we correct a misunderstanding with a heartfelt apology and express our gratitude for the generous gestures of Sharon, Louise, Meg Aldridge, and Lyn Hawker. Then, we'll offer an exciting sneak peek into Henry's upcoming concert that's all set to host a sea of Potters enthusiasts.

Have you ever wondered about the journey that led to the mesmerising voice of Rachel Baase? Tag along as Rachel takes us through the meandering pathways of her life. From her choir days in Yorkshire, her daring move from Scotland, her stint at a bank to the life-altering incident of her mother's passing - each milestone holds a significant place in her heart and career. We'll also relive her memorable audition for GMTV and a nostalgic visit to Jack's grandmother's clothing shop. 

Prepare for a whirlwind of fun as we challenge Rachel in the "Anything But Correct" quiz, and trust us, the responses are downright hilarious! Next, tune in as we deep dive into the culinary world of Kushi-Zameshi and its profound impact on a foodie's journey. We'll navigate the thrilling idea of having an elephant as a pet and decode some popular Christmas songs. Finally, we'll spill the beans about our extensive holiday plans and get a glimpse into next week's electrifying episode with Harley and Mick Dundee. Stay tuned for more surprises and laughter!

Support the Show.

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

What if an apology could set the stage for an unforgettable episode? Brace yourself as we correct a misunderstanding with a heartfelt apology and express our gratitude for the generous gestures of Sharon, Louise, Meg Aldridge, and Lyn Hawker. Then, we'll offer an exciting sneak peek into Henry's upcoming concert that's all set to host a sea of Potters enthusiasts.

Have you ever wondered about the journey that led to the mesmerising voice of Rachel Baase? Tag along as Rachel takes us through the meandering pathways of her life. From her choir days in Yorkshire, her daring move from Scotland, her stint at a bank to the life-altering incident of her mother's passing - each milestone holds a significant place in her heart and career. We'll also relive her memorable audition for GMTV and a nostalgic visit to Jack's grandmother's clothing shop. 

Prepare for a whirlwind of fun as we challenge Rachel in the "Anything But Correct" quiz, and trust us, the responses are downright hilarious! Next, tune in as we deep dive into the culinary world of Kushi-Zameshi and its profound impact on a foodie's journey. We'll navigate the thrilling idea of having an elephant as a pet and decode some popular Christmas songs. Finally, we'll spill the beans about our extensive holiday plans and get a glimpse into next week's electrifying episode with Harley and Mick Dundee. Stay tuned for more surprises and laughter!

Support the Show.

Speaker 2:

First off, we have to make a formal apology because I don't think we can go on before we mentioned this. It'd be Entirely inappropriate.

Speaker 1:

I know that it's going to be at the forefront of everybody's minds and I think at this moment in time, henry and I, on behalf of the resort, want to say we're sorry.

Speaker 2:

We are deeply sorry. A Incident has occurred, a major incident.

Speaker 1:

We don't know how it's happened if I just want to say if you're driving, you might want to pull over. If you're standing, you may want to sit. What we're going to be saying to you next could.

Speaker 2:

Have to put another explicit able on.

Speaker 1:

I was about to say yeah, last week obviously no children. We advise against children.

Speaker 2:

Hmm, and we advise, if you have any young listeners this week Also maybe to avert. There is for a second, because we have Noticed, and some of you pointed out, that our menu has misspelled three words Roulard, roulette and custard now.

Speaker 1:

We know that many of you may be affected by this Incident and again on behalf of everyone at Potter's Resorts, both at Hopton on C and five legs, we are deeply, deeply sorry that this has happened shall I tell you what's kept me going there, jack?

Speaker 2:

What's kept you going being grateful?

Speaker 3:

Hmm.

Speaker 1:

Yes, and I think in all of these troubling times, it is important to be grateful and to visit gratitude corner.

Speaker 3:

This week Jack.

Speaker 2:

I'm grateful for Sharon and Louise, who painted a mug with my face on it. They were here for one of our family breaks recently, over half term, in a very large family, wearing coordinated outfits, which is always fun. Is it fun? I think it is. It was a golden, we're fighting anniversary with Marina and they all was gold coordinated outfit.

Speaker 1:

Well, it was gold, they all wore gold. Oh, I think the is that. I think I see the practicalities of that, because then you don't lose people and crowd precisely, and I'm gonna be.

Speaker 2:

I'm gonna be critical for a moment. I know we're not meant to criticize guests.

Speaker 1:

I mean you do it all the time.

Speaker 2:

That's true Mostly to their faces never bound their backs, but they coordinated every single night, until the final night when they all wore smart outfits. However, one person their party I'm gonna name and show you here Joseph didn't pack a blazer. So everyone wore a jacket, but Joseph didn't.

Speaker 1:

It just surprised me you would have noticed that I notice any Miss coordination.

Speaker 2:

It's like watching a synchronized swimming routine. You'll, you'll know it's yeah. You'll know if it's out of sync. So, joseph, you kind of let let the team down there. I'm gonna be honest, just like it, just gonna call you out. But, sharon and Louise, I'm grateful for you beautiful.

Speaker 1:

I'm grateful for Meg Aldridge because she got me a lovely moving in house present.

Speaker 2:

What'd you get you?

Speaker 1:

Well, she got me a lovely bottle of bubbly and Some cleaning supplies.

Speaker 2:

Well, that's very thoughtful. I was just on Amazon ordering myself some cleaning supplies. Well, you should buy a house and then make all get them for free, that's it.

Speaker 1:

That's how it works.

Speaker 2:

Well, meg Aldridge, we're grateful for you. Do you know? I'm also grateful for Jack. I think you'll probably be grateful for her as well. Lynn Hawker bought us many things. She has family in Australia. Yes you gave me some tea that they promised me. I'm yet to try it, but I will be trying it soon. She also gave us some wedding favors from her son's wedding.

Speaker 1:

Yes, lovely favor.

Speaker 2:

Even though we weren't invited, we still got the gifts, but that's all you really want for a wedding anyway, isn't it? And also the boring stuff she gave us both because she obviously heard the other travesty. It's been a very depressing season About my plant that died. Yeah, she bought me a new plant. Yes, and she also bought me a plant and I've got a money tree and I have one that's like really hard to kill, so what?

Speaker 1:

would you all say.

Speaker 2:

It was like a was it called not succulent is a succulent.

Speaker 1:

Yes, yeah.

Speaker 2:

So, lynn Hawker, we're grateful for you and you, and you and you. We're grateful, we're grateful.

Speaker 4:

We are so grateful.

Speaker 2:

We're grateful, we're grateful for you and you and you and you and you and you. Yeah, that was really nice. I think we should change the theme tune to that.

Speaker 1:

I don't know. I like it as a special.

Speaker 2:

What shall I tell you who? I'm grateful for All of our wonderful guests and staff members who have bought tickets to my concert, which is now sold out. Yeah, february 28. Well, jack, you're gonna be there. I know there is a. I'm gonna tell you something. There is an extensive guest list at this concert of potters people and I'm just gonna bring up. If you are coming to the concert, I feel it's important that you Maybe understand the level of celebrity that you're dealing with.

Speaker 1:

It's not you.

Speaker 2:

You're not the celebrity no, no, no, no, but the people who you might see in the crowd. You've got Jack Jenkins, mark Brewer, Claire Brewer all the brewers are there. Celia potters there, john potters there. I don't know if Harry and Amelia are coming, but I know they bought four tickets, so you would think that could be the case.

Speaker 1:

But that's great, it's great they're sold out so quickly.

Speaker 2:

Mmm, I'm, I'm, I'm thrilled. Less than 48 hours, it's all that. So we are. I know I'm not to use the podcast as a plugging Platform. As Mike has told me many times, we are adding a second performance. So watch this space, but not specifically this space. Watch my personal spaces, which sounds a little bit strange, but my personal.

Speaker 3:

I'm not looking at your personal spaces.

Speaker 2:

I've just realized, jack, I'm gonna have to get very ahead on these edits soon because I'm away again, again. This is what I mean. You're always on holiday, I know, and I'm away Next week. I'm in New York, yeah, having a wonderful time meeting up with Kevin and Thomas. Again we're seeing here we are which is the new Sun time, the final Sun time musical, the merrily revival. Can't wait to, with Jonathan Groff and Daniel Radcliffe. I'm seeing Sutton Foster at Carnegie Hall and also I'm seeing Sweeney again.

Speaker 1:

Well, but you going to America actually brings us onto a new feature, which is topic of the week. What do you think about airports? What's your, what's your sort of airport Tradition?

Speaker 3:

because I think everybody has their own thing.

Speaker 1:

Don't know.

Speaker 2:

First of all, it depends on the airport, doesn't? I mean, there are some pretty amazing airports, and then there's luten, but yes, but you've got. You know, singapore Changi Airport yes, incredible.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

I mean, it's all carpeted, which is amazing. It's a lovely airport. It's a. It's a beautiful airport. They've got a cinema, they've got everything. I once had a wonderful experience flying to Singapore. It was whilst I was touring I we were on Singapore Airlines business class and we used their lounge and, oh my goodness, the Singapore Airlines lounge. What an absolute vibe that is.

Speaker 2:

I mean there's something amazing about a selection of freshly pressed juices before you take a flight and right a buffet of Literally anything you can think of. I mean I was in heaven, I mean see.

Speaker 1:

I like Singapore. Full stop. My my sort of tradition in airports. Those get there straight to the spoons. Hmm, I feel we have slightly different traditions. I have a couple of drinks.

Speaker 2:

I think it's quite easy to fall in love at an airport.

Speaker 1:

I know what you mean.

Speaker 2:

I do not, you mean you sort of just you see any Other human being and you suddenly think I spend the rest of my life with you.

Speaker 1:

It's like the universe has brought us together.

Speaker 2:

I don't know what it is. No, it's travel outfits are always yeah, I know exactly what you mean about that.

Speaker 1:

You just see a lot of attractive people at the airport. You see very attractive people. I don't know if there's any sort of science behind that.

Speaker 2:

Or not. I'd like to know the science, because flying's always had connotations of romance, hasn't?

Speaker 1:

it.

Speaker 2:

Okay. So they put it down to a couple of things. They put it down to anxiety, either Subconscious or conscious anxiety interesting so it's an anxious situation. You're either anxious that you're gonna die on the plane or you're anxious that you're gonna miss your flight or that you need to get somewhere. Yeah, so it gives you a sense of calm. What finding someone attractive, to see someone attractive, and it distracts your brain.

Speaker 1:

The. I mean that airports hire attractive people just to sort of wander around possibly the element of mystery.

Speaker 2:

It's, it's quite a boring place. So the element of mystery you're, you're more aware of what's around you because you're bored, you're waiting. Yeah yeah, I'm such a people watcher as well. That's a little bit strange, but I Did.

Speaker 1:

I just sit and stare at not stare at people, but sitting watch people and wonder hmm.

Speaker 2:

So it's the dynamics. They're right. It's always in either the security queue at the gate.

Speaker 1:

Well, do you know what the other, the other annoying bit about that as well, is when you're waiting for your luggage? Oh, and then everyone seems to stand as close to that conveyor belt as possible. Yeah and you're like what, why just wait until your bag is on its way? Like you don't need to stand your bags always last one.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I always fail always the last one, and then when you do see your bag, you're trying to fight through these people to try and get the an. You can you just get out of my way please?

Speaker 2:

Speaking of all of that, who have we got on this week? Yes, right, rachel Bady At last. I know we can't tell you how long it's taken us to get Rachel Bady on this podcast. Yes, I mean, you asked for Rachel and we have delivered just about. I mean you asked in season one and we tried, we tried.

Speaker 1:

But we finally Coaxed her into the studio. We did whatever chat here it is. Then here is episode. Seven, that's what it is of the all exclusive podcast Press play Finally, we've got you in the room, rachel, I know.

Speaker 2:

Rachel, it's taken a long time. People have wanted you on this podcast. The people of Hopton On Sea have been dying to have your voice gracing the airwaves.

Speaker 4:

I am thrilled, but oh gosh, well you know me, I don't like doing anything like this. But for you I kind of put my fears to one side and hopefully, through the magic of editing, you will make something fairly entertaining out of it.

Speaker 1:

That's the only way we become entertaining to be honest.

Speaker 4:

This is true. It's highly edited.

Speaker 1:

Everything we do is highly edited. But no, it's good to have you here. I think it's interesting. People have found it interesting finding out about different people and I know obviously you're one of the most familiar faces on Resort. Really.

Speaker 4:

Are you trying to save one of the oldest faces?

Speaker 1:

Well, no you're definitely not one of the oldest faces, but you've been here longer than majority of the team, most Longer than most.

Speaker 2:

That was a very gracious way of putting it. I'm sure I'm a vest. I was quite impressed.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that was good of me, but I think it's always interesting to find out about people's backstories. I think as well. That's what we've found, isn't it? So, totally Through all this.

Speaker 2:

Where did it start, Rachel Potters, and your journey with it?

Speaker 4:

My journey with potters. Yeah, or before that, do you want me to go back to my first?

Speaker 2:

Well, let's go back to the very beginning. What was your first kind of experience with your profession as it is now and your career?

Speaker 4:

Well, I think it's where everyone starts. As a youngster I was really really fond of musicals. I grew up with some of the best ones Calamity, jane, the Sound of Music, the King and I, all those and I grew up absolutely loving them and along with my sister we'd often put on shows and things like that for the local people, whether they wanted one or not. We did our little charity shows. I was also quite musical, so I was reading music, playing the violin, playing the piano, and it just kind of all went from there.

Speaker 4:

I then got introduced to a choir leader Leeds Girls Choir, and that I've got to say to anyone if you, no matter what age you are, if you want to sing, whether you think you're good or not, join a choir. Because that was probably what inspired me the most. They literally they sang all different kinds of music four part harmonies, two part harmonies, and even today I still said much rather sing as part of a group than as a soloist. So that's just one thing out there Anybody that wants to sing, join a choir. It's amazing, but that was probably my inspiration. But I was obviously. I was up in Yorkshire, I was from a kind of working class family, so to do that was never really an option. So I kind of stayed in school for as long as I could, did my A-levels. God knows how I passed them, but I did.

Speaker 1:

What did you?

Speaker 4:

study. I studied English, literature, music, art, and then we all had to do general studies, which was basically I don't know whether you I'm old, obviously- I think general studies is gone. Yeah, it probably has.

Speaker 1:

It faded away with the dinosaurs, I think. What were you studying generally?

Speaker 4:

General studies was things that are happening today. So basically you had to be up today with what was going on in the world. So watching the news, reading the paper, that was it. Basically, it was just one of them.

Speaker 2:

I love the sound of that.

Speaker 1:

It was no, I couldn't do anything worse.

Speaker 2:

That actually sounds like a really useful example. Yeah, that's true, rather than studying something that no one's ever going to use.

Speaker 1:

I get the thought process behind it, but yeah, it's just depressing these days.

Speaker 4:

A lot of people say I would love to be back at that point in my life. I wouldn't, yeah, genuinely. I quite enjoyed my time at school, I was fortunate, I had some wonderful teachers and some great people, great friends around me, but I wouldn't want to be back there. It's really difficult now. You know you've got to decide at the age of nine to 18, 19 what you want to do with the rest of your life. I still don't know what I want to do with the rest of my life now.

Speaker 3:

I've never known what I'm doing.

Speaker 4:

No, I don't think we ever do, do we? I think we just take different paths. So, yeah, so inspiration wise watching shows as a child, joining the choir and then being a part of a very musical school which I really enjoyed, so that was my kind of.

Speaker 1:

So a choir number that you used to do that stayed in your head forever that you did and you're like yeah, I remember that.

Speaker 2:

The best choral song.

Speaker 4:

There were so many. Honestly, the choir teacher that we had, he was also a big band leader, so he had all sorts, all sorts of different things we did. That was my first experience. We had Le Mise, we had Miss Saigon that he'd done his own arrangements for with four part harmony. It was beautiful. So Walter Bradley, he was amazing, absolutely brilliant, so I couldn't pinpoint a particular one. I loved them all.

Speaker 1:

How did that then bring you from obviously joining the choir and doing things at school? How did that bring you to Potters? How did that bring you here?

Speaker 4:

Well, it was my mum. Yeah, because I, as an 18, I didn't know what I wanted to do in my life. For all the things that we've just said. It was either go to university, study English literature or I don't know. It was like oh what. But I knew I didn't want to go to university, I didn't want to do another three or four years in education.

Speaker 4:

So I worked for a very well-known shoe shop Part Time which paid for me to go to dance lessons, because everyone had said to me you've got to be able to move a little bit. And I'd never. I played the violin to a very high standard. I played the piano, I sang, but I'd never danced. So I went to Walter Bradley had a friend called Jean Pierce, the mum of Billy Pierce the comedian. I went to her for a little while. She kind of gave me some basics. It didn't last too long because it, you know, just busy life and stuff like that, but she gave me the basics, she gave me a bit of confidence. So I carried on doing that.

Speaker 4:

I did talent competitions. It was the only thing open to me really at that time. I did open auditions down to the West End. So I remember getting my roller skates on my back and going down on the train from leads down to London to audition for Starlight Express, in the hope that it would be either singing or skating first. But it wasn't. It was dancing. And I was like, oh no, it's skating. I can do singing, I can do Dancing. I really can't. But I gave it a go. I thought no, you've come all this way, you've got to give it a go. So we're in this studio. You guys would have probably heard stories like this before and no doubt some of you guys listening would have experienced it, but I never had at that point. So they taught us this routine from Starlight Express off roller skates and it was all over. It's so fast moved. I know you can't see what I'm doing here, but I'm kind of flailing my arms around in the air.

Speaker 1:

As often, all of our guests do at some point or another.

Speaker 2:

That's true. Brian was shaking cocktails a couple of weeks ago.

Speaker 4:

Only Brian. But yeah, and I tried it and then I thought I'd got it, and then they turn you around. So all the things that you've based your routine on, they then turn you around to look in a different direction and it completely threw me. So sadly, I didn't get any further with the Starlight Express.

Speaker 2:

Who is your dream role in Starlight, Rachel?

Speaker 4:

Well, again going back to my singing teacher, his daughter was playing Pearl in Starlight Express in Germany, which is where Ben, I think, was playing Starlight. Express. So at that time, because I was one of his students, I literally don't ask me to recount any of it now, but at one point I did know most of Starlight Express in German Do you know any of Starlight Express Jack?

Speaker 1:

I don't know, absolutely. I don't know nothing about it. It involves roller skates. I'm assuming it's something to do with a train.

Speaker 2:

There's a revival coming to London.

Speaker 1:

There is, it's supposed to be huge, I don't know Is. Pearl, is it like a little bit like Thomas the Tank Engine?

Speaker 4:

Yes.

Speaker 1:

Everyone, Actually yeah, see, that's what I would assume my brain.

Speaker 4:

No, I mean Is.

Speaker 1:

Pearl like a locomotive.

Speaker 4:

Well, at that point she, just to me, was the prettiest and she wore the nicest outfit.

Speaker 2:

This is true. And she sang, only he, which, again, I don't know whether that's still in the show, but Do you know literally any of the words in German store Rachel, of any song, Because Bigger than Need Some we're getting a lot of German.

Speaker 4:

I think it was something like Ick bin ist Diner. That's about it. I need to go to the. When you get to my age, Henry, you need to go. I'll have a think, and if I can dig anything out from the deep depths of my brain, then maybe we can edit this into it later today.

Speaker 2:

As a translation, she said my name is Diner.

Speaker 4:

Eekli Bidik.

Speaker 1:

I love it, that's not in the show. I think I'm going to have to go and watch Starlight Express now.

Speaker 2:

Oh, no, good luck with that. I wouldn't want to sit through Starlight again now.

Speaker 4:

Do you know what? I think it's out of its time. I can honestly say I haven't ever sat through it.

Speaker 2:

That is why I've never seen it about style.

Speaker 4:

It's awful, isn't it? No, I've never seen it.

Speaker 1:

It comes to the musical encyclopedia. Once again, that's true.

Speaker 2:

That's true. So after your starlight audition were there any other shows? That you auditioned for.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I auditioned for loads, but at that point, henry, there was nothing like agents or that. Well, there was, but again, limited access and limited knowledge. I did. My stepdad drove me all the way down to it was down on the south coast somewhere. He drove me all the way down there for a cat's audition, which is really, really bizarre. But I was 18 and again, my big band singing teacher. I had a soprano singing teacher as well, but he always you know they say don't ever sing the song that's in the show. But he said you're good enough to sing the song from a show, so sing the song from a show. So I did.

Speaker 4:

I went down and auditioned for cats. They were looking for Grizabella at the time I think it was Rosemary Ford was playing Grizabella and she was due to leave. So I went down there and I sang memory and the three people that were in there. I was kind of, you know, I was sweating, I was kind of all nervous. But one of the guys came over and said how old are you? And I said I'm 18 and he went yeah, come back. That was really really good, but come back when you were a little bit older. And then I never, ever saw an audition for cats that said a female singer. It was all a female, females who can sing and dance. It all then became very triple threat or became you have to be able to do everything and, sadly, my well, this is a fun fact that I found out the other day.

Speaker 2:

Rachel, which I don't think was in the original production of cats, but Devon, who's in the theater company and did cats on. Was it Royal Caribbean? Yes, I think who did it on Royal Caribbean was saying that now the actress playing group goes, a Bella has to be in the opening dance sequence as well, playing young as a Bella. So now it can't just be, you know, let's wheel on Judy Dench.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, well, it makes. It makes sense, doesn't it? Because they were. It's like now you look and use, you think they bring in. We know that they bring in well known people. Yeah To, to get bombs on seats. So I think I saw Jason Donovan the other day being interviewed. He's playing in Greece at the moment and he's playing beauty school dropout and he was saying it's one of the easiest things he's ever done. He can't believe he's luck, but he was kind of he. But he also said but it's also taken me 30 years to be, able to get to this point.

Speaker 4:

But yeah, it doesn't make any sense. Does it hiring somebody to, unless it's a very well known star who's going to help sell the tickets?

Speaker 1:

You still sing memory today. I do sing it to this day.

Speaker 4:

Well, that's because that's the song that I auditioned with.

Speaker 1:

That's going to say so from, from going and seeing that for an audition for cats, did you then take that to your audition here? How did you? How did you? How did the audition for cats bring you to Potter's and to Hopton?

Speaker 4:

Well, it kind of didn't. It was my mum and back then we had, we didn't, it wasn't online. I don't even know whether computers were invented in that day.

Speaker 1:

But there was a.

Speaker 4:

there was a paper called the Sage newspaper and my mum saw an audition in there for Potter's. So she said I think you should go and I was like, but I want to be in the West End. You don't know. Again, you don't know what you want to do at that age.

Speaker 4:

Anyway, again, I got brought down here and as soon as I came in the doors and this was 30 years ago, so Potter's was a very, very different place then, but it was still outstanding as soon as I went into it was the cabaret bar at the time. Even then, it wasn't what I expected. I auditioned and two weeks later I was down here working. I think it was April Nineteen, ninety three. I up sticks and come down two weeks later and kind of like, yeah, in the job, I haven't been all the way through that. I did obviously have a, have a break, and unexpected break, in between which did me a lot of good actually, but but yeah, I when did I leave here?

Speaker 4:

It was probably 2000 and 2000, 2001. I left and then I got a proper job for a while. Where was that? Oh, my proper job? I don't know whether I'm allowed to say specifics.

Speaker 2:

Am I on?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, yeah you can say that you won't write. Nobody listens to this anyway.

Speaker 2:

I had a lovely time work through.

Speaker 1:

What was it?

Speaker 4:

What was a really sad time, because I don't know whether people know, but that was the year that we lost my mom, not playing hide and seek, but that was the year that we like it always sounds like that, doesn't it so I was at home, got a proper job because my grandma was still around and I worked for a very well known and very customer focused telephone and Internet Bank. There was no way you could specifically go to to pay. They people used to phone you.

Speaker 4:

So, it was it was one of the first of its kind, I believe and that you had to. When customers phoned in, you had to take them through security by asking them passwords and things like that. And we used to do some really random shifts and one of my shifts was a three till nine pm, three till midnight. Three till midnight. And it was getting towards the end of my shift and somebody phoned in and so you had to take them through. You had to ask them for it for an ethically for for letters from their password. So this person phoned in and I said Hi, you're speaking to Rachel from well known bank. Could I please take letter number two from your password? And they said yeah, it's a, a for alpha. Yeah, lovely, can I also take letter number five from your password? And they said why? And I said why? For key, oh, instead of Yankee. Oh, my colleagues opposite me just literally went. Thankfully, the person on the other end of the phone appreciated where.

Speaker 4:

I was Well yeah saw how it had happened and really laughed and actually said I can genuinely say I've never been taken through security, quite like that I can imagine.

Speaker 2:

Can we recreate myself phoning this bank now?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, hello, this is Well-Knowed Bank. You're through to Rachel. How may I help you today?

Speaker 2:

Hello Well-Knowed Bank, I'd like to. What is the question I could ask Jack?

Speaker 1:

What would I like to do? You want to release some funds. I'd like to release some funds please.

Speaker 4:

OK, can I first of all please take you through security.

Speaker 2:

Of course you can Well-Knowed Bank.

Speaker 4:

Lovely. Could I please take letter number 5 from your password?

Speaker 2:

Yes, it's X.

Speaker 4:

Lovely X for X-ray.

Speaker 2:

Yes.

Speaker 4:

And letter number 11, please.

Speaker 2:

Why.

Speaker 4:

Why for X-ray?

Speaker 2:

That's the one that's.

Speaker 1:

I thought when you said that the first time I was about to have to say why.

Speaker 2:

Because we need, yeah, because it was that why?

Speaker 1:

Oh, because we need this for security. That's where I thought that was going. Did you used to go to my NAND shop? I did yes, because I remember that. My first interaction with you was because you were talking to my NAND. I remember that my NAND used to Well, she used to run her hairdressers but then she ran a clothes shop down Galston High Street.

Speaker 4:

She did and I got a lovely. In my early years at Potters we auditioned there was this thing for GMTV. It was GMTV at the time and I auditioned Me and two other people auditioned for this competition and I won the girls' section and the two boys won their section. So we all basically got flown out to Malta and the prize was to we were going to win a trip to New York and an audition with Cameron McIntosh. That was the prize. So it was kind of like, wow, this is all really exciting. We were young, we were kind of, and that's why I went into your NAND shop, nand, or grand Grand, my NAND, yeah, anymore, in the chat.

Speaker 1:

I went into.

Speaker 4:

Hi, and I bought the most beautiful coral jumpsuit, evening jumpsuit. There's a photo of it somewhere. I think Russell's got a photo. He's got some old magazines of me and Ruben because we won it, but I am in the outfit that I bought from your NAND it was a great experience.

Speaker 2:

NAND or NAND Stylist to the stars.

Speaker 1:

That'll go straight to her head.

Speaker 4:

It was honestly, but I won and maybe it was the outfit, I think it probably was the outfit.

Speaker 1:

Is that the only TV thing you've done?

Speaker 4:

I'm trying to think of.

Speaker 3:

You've told me a story of another thing.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, okay, we won't talk about it. Hang on, I don't know the story.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, no, I don't know. This is why I don't like things. I did one thing and yeah.

Speaker 1:

I can't remember the details of it. That's why I what was it? We don't have to use it on the podcast.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, no, Honestly no we wouldn't know.

Speaker 4:

I do not want to relive that, relive that moment. It was just awful, oh.

Speaker 3:

God.

Speaker 4:

It was. We're making it sound much worse than it was. It was just a throwaway TV program that never got kind of re.

Speaker 3:

What's the?

Speaker 4:

word. It never came back. It had one series, I think.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I think you and being recorded is not the same. No, that's what I mean.

Speaker 4:

That's why I avoid it at all costs. Rachel and microphones in a live scenario is fine, because when it's live, it's done, it's forgotten. When it's recorded, it has the ability to come back and, oh, I want you.

Speaker 2:

I get that, Rachel. Luckily, if you say anything stupid in here, we won't use it.

Speaker 4:

Do I trust Henry, everybody? I don't know.

Speaker 3:

I do.

Speaker 2:

Because it wasn't like the time where Zack said hmm, yes, and we just replayed the clip about 50,000 times throughout the whole season one. We just kept playing it.

Speaker 4:

If you know what I mean, so long as it makes people smile.

Speaker 2:

Yes, zack, does it make people smile?

Speaker 1:

Yes, hmm, yes.

Speaker 2:

This is a big moment now, Rachel.

Speaker 1:

This is a big moment, because this is the bit where we give you a test. It's more of a pop quiz, a little pop quiz for you. Everyone does it.

Speaker 3:

A little pop quiz A little rubbish at pot. No, no, no.

Speaker 1:

It's called the ABC quiz.

Speaker 2:

Which stands for anything but correct. I just what happened there?

Speaker 1:

I kind of choked on the air. Shall we try that again?

Speaker 2:

The ABC quiz, which stands for anything but correct, correct.

Speaker 1:

If we say, if we give you the example of what colour is the sky?

Speaker 4:

You could say green. Does that mean, I'm telepathically linked?

Speaker 2:

to you, Henry. We've always been linked.

Speaker 1:

You get 47 seconds, I thought it was 48.

Speaker 2:

You've just given her less seconds than Chloe Driscoll had.

Speaker 1:

It's been a while and, yes, all you've got to do is answer as many incorrectly as possible. I've actually put that on to one hour and 48 seconds, so let me just change that.

Speaker 2:

Sean got given 48 minutes.

Speaker 3:

Oh my goodness, me and even then he talked over there. But you know what?

Speaker 1:

Sean's like here we go. Then 48 seconds of the clock starts now.

Speaker 3:

What is your name, elizabeth? What part?

Speaker 1:

of the body. Does the dentist work on the knee? What name or musical instrument?

Speaker 4:

A wooden brush.

Speaker 1:

What do you?

Speaker 3:

keep in your pockets my.

Speaker 4:

Oh, this is harder than you think. My car.

Speaker 1:

Name something you'd have on toast.

Speaker 3:

Gravy. What is Andy Murray famous for? He's a basketball player. Name an orange vegetable, a pineapple. What is a young cat called?

Speaker 1:

A dog.

Speaker 3:

Name the opposite of backwards, upwards. What do you cut? A loaf of bread with A fork? What noise? Oh, I've started to, so I'll finish, alright, magnus.

Speaker 1:

What noise does an elephant make?

Speaker 4:

Meow.

Speaker 2:

Wow, now you're going to have to bear with me for a couple of seconds, because usually I jump straight into this. However, I have to fact check two of your answers using Google, because I'm struggling with them.

Speaker 3:

I don't even know what I asked.

Speaker 1:

I can't even remember what I asked.

Speaker 2:

So, rachel, you answered 11 questions.

Speaker 4:

Right.

Speaker 2:

I'm going to take away one point here.

Speaker 3:

Why Is it the pineapple one?

Speaker 2:

No, that is a wooden brush used in percussion instruments, so is in fact a musical instrument. I was going to take away another point but, I, won't which one, because gravy on toast.

Speaker 4:

People don't actually have gravy on toast.

Speaker 2:

So this is an American dish.

Speaker 4:

Gravy on toast.

Speaker 1:

No, but there's chipped beef gravy. Nobody chips their gravy.

Speaker 4:

That looks like kind of lard.

Speaker 2:

It doesn't look like, it doesn't look very appetising, but we aren't going to take a point away from that. Does Rachel get any bonus points?

Speaker 1:

Don't try and bring me into this for the first time ever.

Speaker 2:

Um, I don't, rachel. This is what I call playing it safe in the ABC quiz.

Speaker 4:

That messes with your brain and I was trying to be careful. We've both done it.

Speaker 1:

We've done about 20 of these, and this is the first time he's actually given it any thought.

Speaker 2:

You've still done better than me when I did the ABC quiz, which means you leave with 10 points.

Speaker 4:

I'm very impressed and proud of myself. Thank you very much.

Speaker 2:

You should be.

Speaker 1:

Here we are with the scores on the doors for the ABC quiz. In third place, dan Fox and Rachel Bady with 10 points Joint. Second, joe B and Chloe Driscoll 14 points.

Speaker 2:

First place.

Speaker 1:

Brian Graves 15 points. Good on you, brian. Good on you Brian.

Speaker 2:

Well done.

Speaker 1:

Brian.

Speaker 3:

You're just all bad.

Speaker 1:

So obviously you've been here at Potters, or part of Potters, quite some time now. If you were to spend a day holidaying here, what would your perfect Potters day look like? Because obviously we offer quite a lot, but what would appeal to you is your perfect Potters day.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, do you know what? I was having that conversation with somebody just the other day.

Speaker 3:

I don't know whether I could do it. It's exhausting.

Speaker 4:

Especially if I mean, obviously we have our family breaks, we have our design for adults breaks and currently we've got our bowlers break and we keep those guys so busy. They're so much. I practice kushi-zameshi.

Speaker 1:

Bless you.

Speaker 4:

Kushi-zameshi is.

Speaker 2:

No.

Speaker 4:

So I practice kushi-zameshi, so I therefore particularly enjoy the restaurant experience. So I would Do you want to Google Kushi's Amishi? It's one of my favorite things. I think we all practice a little bit of Kushi's Amishi, if I'm honest.

Speaker 2:

Okay, so just talk to us about what that is for a second once. I find it.

Speaker 4:

So it's basically when your mouth is lonely so you eat. It's a true thing, henry. It's a true thing. I am kind of being a little bit funny with it, but it's a true thing. It's a Japanese phrase that is unique to Japan, and it means lonely mouth, right?

Speaker 1:

It's true, it's one of the funniest things I've ever learned.

Speaker 4:

So yeah, I was being obviously slightly lost in Japan, so it's a word. Don't read the proper definition.

Speaker 2:

People use this word a lot to mean eating when bored or sometimes stress. I said Kevin Marks, a language instructor in Japan and the author of Speak Japanese in 90 Days.

Speaker 1:

Typical Japanese name Kevin.

Speaker 3:

Marks.

Speaker 4:

However, I think it's a wonderful phrase don't you, I think it's wonderful. So that basically means I'm a foodie I love. I love food. I know you'd never know it, but I love it. So when I go on holiday I love breakfast, because I don't have that at home. So I love going in for a really nice breakfast. So it might start with fresh fruit and then. So that would be my first point of contact. And then, being where we are, I'm talking obviously about Hopton Potters Resorts in Hopton.

Speaker 2:

On, sea On sea On sea.

Speaker 4:

Potters Resorts, hopton, on sea On sea. On sea when we are literally on the sea, so I'd probably go down. I'd probably go down to the on sea area, have a paddle, yes, and then perhaps quite like a facial Aphrodite. Every time I walk into Aphrodite, the smell in there is just lovely.

Speaker 1:

We are going to do an episode from in there.

Speaker 4:

Ah, that's just you trying to get a free facial, isn't it? Can I do that?

Speaker 2:

I think we would like to do that. We can do that and then satisfy our lonely mouths.

Speaker 4:

It's great innit. You're not going to let that one go. Honestly, Kushi, Kushi.

Speaker 3:

Zemishi is the way to go.

Speaker 4:

It even feels nice to say it, doesn't it? Come on, say it, kushi.

Speaker 3:

Zemishi.

Speaker 4:

I'd probably do a quiz, have some more dinner. Kushi Zemishi, you know, and then watch the show and you know when you even say that, when you say all of that in one sentence and you think that's one place, it still amazes me that you can literally and there's so much more.

Speaker 2:

That part of the episode used to last an hour. That used to fill an hour's interview.

Speaker 4:

That's what the question is. It's crazy. It's crazy, there's so much. There's so much.

Speaker 1:

Two points to that, then what would be your dream meal then for dinner at Potter's Resort? Help me out on scene.

Speaker 4:

What If I could?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's part of that perfect day then, and obviously, what would be your perfect dinner with that?

Speaker 4:

Oh I don't know.

Speaker 1:

Have you got anything in mind that you'd usually go for?

Speaker 4:

I don't know. Do you mean in terms of what's already on offer here? I genuinely I don't know. I don't know what I'd do for dinner.

Speaker 1:

I'm trying to kind of figure out. No, I didn't know if there was a particular. You said that.

Speaker 4:

I tell you what I do for lunch. I tell you what I do for lunch. For lunch, I think we do the best fish and chips here. We do the best fish and chips.

Speaker 1:

I haven't had that for a while, but I do enjoy it when I do have it.

Speaker 4:

I totally go for fish and chips. In terms of dinner, I don't know what's currently on the menu. So I'm kind of trying to use that as inspiration, but I can't think so. Yeah, I don't know, being a foodie, there's too much choice. I'd struggle to Without some thought.

Speaker 2:

I'd struggle to tell you that, Going into the evening, what would be your perfect show? You've been here. You've seen a lot of shows here. What's your favourite one across all the years that you would love to see on your perfect Potter's break if you could?

Speaker 4:

Oh gosh, Henry, that's another difficult one, that's another like menu one.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 4:

Because you know there's and I get this from guests all the time, because things evolve, don't they? And change, and I think I've seen so many wonderful shows over the years that I've been here and, very thankfully and gratefully, been a part of a lot of them. I mean, I'm a fan. I'm a fan of Christmas anyway, so I love Christmas, I love everything that attaches itself to Christmas. So I think that we do Christmas brilliantly here as a resort, as a complete resort. I think we do Christmas brilliantly.

Speaker 1:

I agree, I think we do Christmas weeks a bit. It's longer than that, isn't it? Seven years yeah.

Speaker 4:

But everything from the decorations to the music to the show, I mean I just think that we do it really well here. So yeah Again, sorry, henry, to disappoint, I can't pinpoint a specific one, because I've. What I do know is that I've ever seen, whilst I've worked here, I don't find myself going to as many shows in terms of musical theatre shows externally to here, and I think the reason for that is that we've been spoiled over the years. I find myself being quite as opposed to sitting and enjoying a show.

Speaker 4:

I find myself kind of being a bit critical of it because, we've seen so much talent here, I think we do things so well that I find myself now, at my stage in life, wanting more or so to go and watch a comedian or a play, or something that we don't offer here.

Speaker 2:

Sure, do you know what I mean?

Speaker 4:

Sorry, I have strayed away from the question but we have no comedy here, Definitely not.

Speaker 1:

Was there a show that, the years gone by, that there's your favourite one to have been a part of?

Speaker 4:

The variety shows. I've always been really proud of.

Speaker 4:

And before that it was what was it? I think it was called Rachel and Friends or something like that. But when I first came back, I suppose when I first came back, so that would have been 2000. About 2006, 2007, I was invited to take part in the shows as a cover, and it was a musical show at that point and I really really enjoyed that Because, again, I love the musicals. And then from that I was put into the comedy again. So there was a musical show where I, along with Buzz and a couple of other people, did a comedy sketch that kind of grew over three, over three sections throughout the show and I really really enjoyed that.

Speaker 2:

And the reason I enjoyed that.

Speaker 4:

For those of you who might remember this, who are listening, and you might remember this, it was the one where the microphone went wrong and then, following that, the trapdoor squeaked and then, following that, the pots moved. It was the Shirley Bassie, more common wise sketch. It was like a retake on that and it built, and it built, and it built. And what I loved again, I just love. There's nothing quite like it's lovely being able to sing, it's lovely being able to bring joy to people through singing, through song. But if you can make people laugh, whether it be in a conversation one to one, or whether it be in a room and as part of a team of people, I just think there's nothing better. There's nothing better than hearing people laugh.

Speaker 2:

It's like the best gift that you can get it really is and it's contagious.

Speaker 4:

It's contagious as well, but it's also really really hard. So I think actually, having talked my way around it, I really enjoyed being a part of that, because it was a wonderful show and I really enjoyed the fact that we were making people laugh, because it's difficult, comedy is so hard. You've got to find these golden nuggets and it's kind of, and you can't. When you find that golden nugget, you can't then repeat it for quite some time afterwards, because people remember it, because it was that golden nugget.

Speaker 1:

We're going to ask you a couple of quickfire questions. You don't have to answer them quickfire. You just have to sort of give them the first thing that comes into your head.

Speaker 4:

And are they based on anything particular? Is there a content? Is there a subject matter?

Speaker 1:

No, it's all just sort of general interview question, job interview questions, just to find you a brand new job.

Speaker 2:

Just to find me a brand new job, oh yeah, because I know what I want to be.

Speaker 1:

Is that where this is going to be? What would you like to be if you could be anything?

Speaker 4:

Oh, if I could be so.

Speaker 1:

For this. We'll take it into consideration.

Speaker 4:

Okay, so realistically, realistically, I'd love to be a celebrant for weddings and funerals.

Speaker 1:

Oh it's, I misheard what you said there.

Speaker 4:

No, I would love to be a celebrant. I think, to be able to do weddings and funerals is. I think that would be a wonderful job. So that's in reality, but my dream job If it could come without the fame, because I don't ever want to be famous. I quite like to be rich, but I don't really ever want to be famous. But I'd love to be a comedy. I'd love, I'd love for them to make Vicariddible take two and I'd love to be in that role.

Speaker 2:

Or Vicariddible the musical.

Speaker 4:

Oh my gosh. I'd absolutely love to do that role. But I'm talking sorry, I do this a lot. I'm talking myself because I don't want to be famous and obviously Dawn French is wonderful and she's really famous and even if you were in the Vicariddible the musical, you'd still be famous. So maybe a script writer.

Speaker 2:

If you had an elephant. You've been given an elephant and you can't give it away.

Speaker 4:

African or Indian? Big one has big ears, one has little ears. Which one?

Speaker 1:

What would you?

Speaker 4:

prefer. I quite like big ears because if I have a hot flush they flat. African ears yeah.

Speaker 2:

So what would you do with it? You can't sell it and you can't give it away. Well, what would you do with this elephant? Would it be a fan?

Speaker 4:

Would it be a fan?

Speaker 1:

Not as a supporter, as in just keeping you cool.

Speaker 4:

I couldn't give it away. This is the most bizarre, so I haven't ever thought about this. Well, I feel really bad. I think I'd go to whatever lengths I had to to try and get it back to where it needed to be.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, but it needs to be with you. No, it doesn't need. It wants to be with you, it doesn't want to.

Speaker 4:

How do we know?

Speaker 2:

Because it showed up at your door, Rachel. It doesn't talk. Yes, it does.

Speaker 1:

It sounds like you'd want to go on a journey with it. A journey of self-discovery for the elephant.

Speaker 4:

Like eat very love. That is the most random thing. I genuinely don't know what to say.

Speaker 1:

Would you escort it back to the Plains of Africa?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I would try to, I think. But then if it didn't come from there, what if it came from a zoo? And then I put it out into the Plains of Africa and it died.

Speaker 2:

Well then it's blood's on your hands, exactly, I might have more, but that's all, so I might just let it have my spare room. Yeah, okay, so it would just be a housemate.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

What is the last thing you popped into Google? You can check.

Speaker 2:

Oh God, I feel like I know the answer to this. Well, it might have been actually. What was it? Because I was there, I think. Was it Mary's Boy Child by Boney M.

Speaker 4:

No, that was Spotify.

Speaker 2:

Oh, okay.

Speaker 4:

That was Spotify. The last thing I put into Google was the lyrics for oh, come on, you faithful.

Speaker 2:

Third verse. And what is the third verse?

Speaker 4:

I can't remember. I copied and pasted it First. Christmas is approaching. My brain doesn't retain, it has to let some of it go.

Speaker 2:

So this is a question. You're stuck on a desert island.

Speaker 4:

Am I with someone handsome? Was it just me? Well, it's up to you.

Speaker 2:

It's completely up to you. Because you can only be there with one Potter's team member, past or present. Who is it?

Speaker 4:

If I can only be there with one. But do I have to take anyone? I think I'd quite like to just go on my own.

Speaker 2:

That's what Brian said. Why don't you take?

Speaker 4:

Brian, oh God, what you can sing. Opera on the desert island.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you can sing. Time to Say Goodbye with Brian.

Speaker 1:

It's not quite my song though.

Speaker 2:

He can approach you.

Speaker 4:

I think I don't know who would you take.

Speaker 2:

Oh, who did you answer? I chose Mama Jules.

Speaker 4:

Mama Jules, that's a good one.

Speaker 1:

I think I chose Celia Potter again.

Speaker 2:

Celia is actually the most frequently picked person, which no one really knows why, but she is.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I don't know. I mean you've got to think Susanna from Reception. She really makes me laugh.

Speaker 2:

All the girls.

Speaker 4:

Do you know what? It's really hard. Can we just have a flight for everyone to go? Wouldn't that be great if we could all go on holiday?

Speaker 2:

together. Hypothetically, yes, but sadly, when the plane crashed it wasn't. Yeah, that was what happened, rachel.

Speaker 1:

But thanks for bringing us all along with you. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Finally, Rachel.

Speaker 4:

Yes, Henry.

Speaker 2:

The most important question.

Speaker 4:

Yes, Henry.

Speaker 2:

Possibly of all time.

Speaker 4:

Yes, Henry.

Speaker 2:

And you have to answer it, otherwise we'd just sit here in silence until Okay and we have all day, okay.

Speaker 4:

I don't.

Speaker 2:

No, I know you don't, Rachel, but we've locked the door.

Speaker 4:

But there's a window.

Speaker 3:

I've already found my escape room. Have fun, have fun.

Speaker 2:

Okay, who would you rather take on holiday? Me or Jack Jenkins, that's me.

Speaker 4:

Who would I rather take on? This is really hard, because I don't like upsetting people.

Speaker 1:

I thought you were going to say I don't like you forever.

Speaker 4:

No, I don't, no, no, I can't.

Speaker 2:

Rachel, not a choice.

Speaker 4:

I can't do that I think I'd want to take both of you on holiday, for different reasons.

Speaker 1:

Whatwhich reason would you weigh towards? Because everyone has had to Choose.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 4:

You can't literally do it on holiday. Okay, who would I take on holiday? Henry, I'd take you.

Speaker 2:

Thank you, Rachel. Why is that?

Speaker 4:

Because we could earn some extra money singing wherever we were. We could literally put a cap out. Sorry Jack.

Speaker 3:

I know I agree.

Speaker 4:

But I'm thinking outside of the kind of box a little bit. We could take a cap in hand, we could sing and we could get a little bit of spending money on our holidays.

Speaker 2:

I love that idea. Rachel, let's go.

Speaker 1:

I enjoy it when people pick Henry, because not a lot of people do.

Speaker 4:

Really, how's it going? Is it kind of like 60, 40, 70, 30?, whatwho's Sort of?

Speaker 2:

More like 95, 5. Yeah, just before you go, rachel, we have to give you then your oh yeah, your brand new job role.

Speaker 4:

Oh yeah, my brand new job role.

Speaker 2:

I was going to kick her out and your brand new job role is. A poll dancer If you'd like that, rachel, a telephone sales rep. Ha ha, ha ha ha In the booking lounge.

Speaker 3:

Perfect.

Speaker 2:

Because you have a lovely voice, Rachel. People have been listening to you now for almost an hour.

Speaker 4:

Do you mean they? No, they must have stopped listening. They must have stopped listening.

Speaker 2:

Well, if they're listening to this bit, then they canthen. They've obviously been listening. Or they just skipped to the end.

Speaker 1:

Oh, and if so, then go back and listen to it, yeah what are you doing, anyway, anyway.

Speaker 2:

So you've got a lovely voice to listen to. You've had experience on the phone before. Well, with the bank, of course, we don't need to talk about that again. No, no pollsters. Very well. So I just think you'd be a great, great choice. Bye, bye, thank you.

Speaker 1:

So next week we're off to Five.

Speaker 2:

Lakes. Again we are Jack. We're off to Five Lakes for actually next two weeks. Yes, Believe that. Oh, spoilers. Yeah, I know. Well, sorry, but we might as well tell them Jack.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Next week we have Harley from Activities sporting his mullet in full force?

Speaker 1:

It definitely was. I mean, obviously you won't be able to see the mullet.

Speaker 2:

No but you can imagine it's there.

Speaker 1:

They had an interesting chat with.

Speaker 2:

Harley, wasn't it? Yes, it was. And then shall we tell people the week after, and then the week after.

Speaker 1:

That is the one, the only, mick Dundee, yes, so it's a double back to back Five Lakes for you for those two weeks we're there for two weeks.

Speaker 2:

I mean we're not actually there because it's all through the magic of podcast editing. Don't spoil that, no, but you know, then you'll get people talking to us like they did last time.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, they'll go to Five Lakes thinking that we're actually there.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, precisely, we were there. But we will be there next week. I guarantee I'll see someone in New York. Well, we'll see you next time on another episode of your.

Speaker 1:

Exclusive Podcast. Bye, go to the fireworks now. Have they got toffee apples? I don't think so.

Speaker 2:

What is the actual point?

Apology, Gratitude, and Airports
Rachel Potters' Musical Journey and Career
Potter's Memories and New York Prize
ABC Quiz and TV Memories
Exploring Kushi-Zameshi
Elephant Ownership and Hypothetical Holiday Plans
Upcoming Episodes of Exclusive Podcast